“Australia on Tuesday proposed a new law requiring technology firms such as Alphabet Inc’s Google, Facebook and Apple to give police access to private encrypted data linked to suspected illegal activities,” Erin Cooper reports for Reuters. “The measure, which targets platforms the Australian government says could be used for criminal activities or to plan a terror attack, would require police to get a court warrant to access the encrypted data.”

“It sets fines of up to A$10 million ($7.3 million) for institutions that do not comply, and jail time for individuals, but has yet to be presented in parliament and it was not clear when it could become law,” Cooper reports. “An industry group that includes Google, Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo! and Microsoft called for a “constructive and public dialogue” with the government as the Assistance and Access Bill 2018 goes through parliament.”

“Apple did not immediately respond to request for a comment,” Cooper reports. “Cybersecurity experts worried about a lack of judicial oversight, saying the policy was out of step with privacy laws elsewhere.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: If Apple doesn’t have the data, they cannot hand over anything.

Here’s to iCloud becoming fully end-to-end encrypted!

Again, people who willingly subjugate themselves to government, regardless of how beneficent or harmless or whatever they perceive their current government to be, are utterly ignorant of history.

Encryption is binary; it’s either on or off. You cannot have both. You either have privacy via full encryption or you don’t by forcing back doors upon Apple or anybody else. It’s all or nothing. — MacDailyNews, March 8, 2017

We’d bet Australia will go without iPhones before Apple destroys their iOS platform by building in backdoors.

There have been people that suggest that we should have a back door. But the reality is if you put a backdoor in, that backdoor’s for everybody, for good guys and bad guys. — Apple CEO Tim Cook

Strong encryption without back doors or U.S. companies’ tech products will be eschewed around the world.MacDailyNews, January 15, 2016

Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. – Benjamin Franklin, Historical Review of Pennsylvania, 1759

SEE ALSO:
iCloud changes put Apple on collision course with overreaching governments – July 20, 2017
Apple flies in top executives to lobby Australia’s Turnbull government on encryption laws – July 19, 2017
Apple meeting with Australian government to discuss proposed encryption ‘back doors’ – July 18, 2017
What WikiLeaks’ CIA data dump tells us: Encryption works – March 11, 2017
WikiLeaks reveals CIA’s global covert hacking program targeting Apple iPhone, Google Android, Microsoft Windows and even Samsung TVs – March 7, 2017
Proving Apple’s assertion that there are no good backdoors, hacker dumps iOS cracking tools allegedly stolen from Cellebrite – February 2, 2017
A hacker just proved that Apple was right to worry about creating a backdoor to the iPhone – January 13, 2017
Apple CEO Tim Cook touts encryption at Senator Orrin Hatch’s Utah Tech Tour – October 3, 2016
Feckless FBI unable to unlock iPhone, even with a ‘fingerprint unlock warrant’ – May 12, 2016
FBI’s Comey says agency paid more than $1 million to access San Bernadino iPhone – April 21, 2016
Nothing significant found on San Bernardino’s terrorist’s iPhone – April 14, 2016
FBI director confirms hack only works on older iPhones that lack Apple’s Secure Enclave – April 7, 2016
Apple responds to FBI: ‘This case should have never been brought’ – March 29, 2016
Apple CEO Cook: ‘You can’t have a back door that’s only for the good guys’ – November 21, 2015
Now Apple is going to stop the U.S. government from getting into iCloud data, too – March 28, 2016