“On Thursday afternoon, Apple noted in an SEC filing that it was issuing $7 billion worth of new bonds,” Matt Rosoff writes for CNBC. “Apple generates cash flows of nearly $40 billion every six months. It’s the richest company in the world, with more than $256.8 billion in cash and marketable securities sitting on its books. Why does such a rich company have to borrow money?”

Rosoff writes, “CEO Tim Cook gave a clue in his interview with CNBC ‘Mad Money’ host Jim Cramer last week… ‘If you sell globally, you earn money globally. If you earn money globally, you can’t bring it back into the United States unless you pay 35 percent plus your state tax. And you look at this and you go, ‘This is kind of bizarre.’ You want people to use this money in the United States to invest more. We are in a good position, but an unusual one. Our good position is we can borrow. And so to invest in the United States, we have to borrow. This doesn’t make sense on a broad basis…'”

Rosoff writes, “Changing the tax policy on repatriated funds is one of the areas that President Trump and congressional Republicans have talked about fixing.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Obviously, the U.S. needs tax reform desperately.

Under the current U.S. corporate tax system, it would be very expensive to repatriate that cash. Unfortunately, the tax code has not kept up with the digital age. The tax system handicaps American corporations in relation to our foreign competitors who don’t have such constraints on the free flow of capital… Apple has always believed in the simple, not the complex. You can see it in our products and the way we conduct ourselves. It is in this spirit that we recommend a dramatic simplification of the corporate tax code. This reform should be revenue neutral, eliminate all corporate tax expenditures, lower corporate income tax rates and implement a reasonable tax on foreign earnings that allows the free flow of capital back to the U.S. We make this recommendation with our eyes wide open, realizing this would likely increase Apple’s U.S. taxes. But we strongly believe such comprehensive reform would be fair to all taxpayers, would keep America globally competitive and would promote U.S. economic growth.Apple CEO Tim Cook, May 21, 2013

SEE ALSO:
Apple borrows billions while sitting on massive overseas cash mountain – May 10, 2017
Why Apple is investing $148 billion in corporate debt – May 4, 2017
President Trump’s tax reform plan includes deep cuts in corporate taxes – April 26, 2017
Apple raises $10 billion in debt ahead of President Trump’s repatriation tax plans – February 3, 2017
After Apple’s blowout earnings, the Street looks toward ‘iPhone X’ and President Trump’s tax reforms – February 3, 2017
President-elect Trump’s corporate tax reform expected to have some positive impact on Apple EPS – January 14, 2017
Apple has now amassed nearly $80 billion in debt – September 12, 2016