Meet the unemployed programmer who kept sneaking into Apple to finish his project

“Ron Avitzur knew his project was doomed. By the time his bosses cut the cord in August 1993, his team was actually relieved,” Julia Dahl reports for World’s Strangest. “The graphing calculator program they’d been working on for new mobile devices had finally been shelved, and they could all move on.”

“Most of his fellow programmers were reassigned to other projects within Apple. The company offered Avitzur a job, too, but it didn’t interest him,” Dahl reports. “Avitzur, then 27, had been freelancing at tech companies since he was a student at Stanford—to him, the work wasn’t worth it if it wasn’t interesting. And what interested him was finishing the graphing calculator program that had just been canceled.”

Dahl reports, “But his ambitions were greater than that—Avitzur wanted to make the graphing calculator work on the new PowerPC computer that Apple planned to ship in early 1994… His Apple gig had paid well, and Avitzur lived simply. He could work for almost a year without a paycheck. Plus, Apple had lots of extra offices and computers— who would it hurt if he just kept coming in? It would be the perfect crime.”

Read more in the full article here.

[Attribution: Cult of Mac.]

24 Comments

  1. Apple in the old old days also allowed Microsoft engineers who were working for MS Word and other programs (for Apple operating systems) access to Apple with few restrictions …

    … result: Windows.

    sorry for cynicism but for one selfless dude there are 50 out there to take advantage of the situation. That’s why Apple has so much security now.

    1. Nasty? Actually, the Corolla GT-S from that model year is one of the most coveted cars with the tuner crowd — lightweight, easy to modify, and rear-wheel drive. Simple, sporty little car with great road feel that’s equally at home on a rally course or drifting circuit. The newly introduced RWD Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ is the modern incarnation of the Corolla GT-S.

      http://www.insideline.com/scion/fr-s/2013/2013-scion-fr-s-vs-1985-toyota-corolla-gt-s.html
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_AE86

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