“Apple is being sued after it admitted to slowing down older iPhone models to keep them running longer,” Arjun Kharpal reports for CNBC. “On Wednesday, the U.S. technology giant said that it has algorithms in place to help keep an iPhone running at optimal performance if there is an older battery inside that can’t keep up with the required power. The aim is to stop unexpected shutdowns of older iPhones and keep them running to the best possible standard.”

“However, Stefan Bogdanovich and Dakota Speas brought a class action lawsuit in California — where they are residents — against Apple, an official filing revealed Thursday,” Kharpal reports. “They claim that Apple never requested consent from them to ‘slow down their iPhones.’ Both plaintiffs are owners of an iPhone 7. Bogdanovich and Speas claim they ‘suffered interferences to their iPhone usage due to the intentional slowdowns.'”

Kharpal reports, “Both people are also claiming damages from Apple because they said the company’s actions caused them to suffer ‘economic damages and other harm for which they are entitled to compensation.'”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: “Economic damages and other harm?” Puleeeze.

Apple should provide a toggle switch in Settings where users specify if they’d like to keep running at high processor speeds even if it means rapid shutdowns or if they’d like to run at lower processors speeds to accommodate an aging battery that requires replacement.

Again, lithium-ion batteries are to mobile devices as tires are to vehicles.

As with your car’s tires, which are not covered in even the most comprehensive vehicle service arrangements, your iPhone batteries are your responsibility. Normal wear and tear. Apple, if they should do anything, should make this point exceedingly clear and even include an alert on devices to inform users that states something like:

Your battery has just completed its 500th charging cycle and, to maintain peak performance, needs to be replaced. Your battery is designed to retain up to 80% of its original capacity at 500 complete charge cycles. Your warranty covers a defective battery, but it doesn’t cover battery wear from normal use. For your convenience, your device will continue operating at reduced processor speeds until replacement can be performed.

• If you’re covered under AppleCare+, we’ll replace your battery at no charge if it retains less than 80 percent of its original capacity.
• If your iPhone needs battery replacement and it’s not covered, the service fee is $79.
• If your iPhone has another power issue, we’ll give you the repair price after we determine the cause.

The three bullet points above are exactly Apple’s policy today.

Information on how to maximize your iPhone’s battery life and lifespan is here.

SEE ALSO:
How and where to replace your old, depreciated iPhone battery – December 21, 2017
Should Apple replace aging iPhone batteries for free instead of throttling processor speed? – December 21, 2017
Apple confirms iPhones with older batteries will take hits in performance – December 20, 201
iPhone performance and battery age – December 18, 2017
Apple met with Chinese regulators to discuss iPhone 6s unexpected shutdowns – February 10, 2017
Rumor: Apple may extend iPhone 6s battery replacement program to iPhone 6 – January 17, 2017
A message from Apple about 
iPhone and unexpected shutdowns – December 2, 2016
Apple offers free battery replacement for ‘very small number’ of iPhone 6s units with unexpected shutdown issue – November 21, 2016