75% of Netflix subscribers surveyed do not intend to subscribe to either Disney+ or Apple TV+

According to an analysts’ survey conducted in September, 75% of Netflix subscribers surveyed do not intend to subscribe to either Disney+ or Apple TV+.

Michael Sheetz for CNBC:

“Our survey suggests that the majority (~75%) of Netflix subscribers do not intend to subscribe to either Disney+ or Apple TV+. For those that do expect to use one of these offerings, the vast majority expect to also maintain their Netflix subscription,” Piper Jaffray analyst Michael Olson said.

MacDailyNews Take: If you conducted a survey after Apple unveiled the iPod on October 23, 2001 and before people could experience it for themselves, we bet more than 75% would have said they did not intend to purchase an iPod.

In fact, they each bought at least five of them and they’re still buying them today.

Any purchase/subscription intent survey prior to product/service release is valuable only for comedic purposes after the sales/subscriber figures begin to roll in.

20 Comments

      1. But isn’t that the intent? Offer a lower price, with free yearly subscriptions with device purchases. Not year one, but as the service grows with more and more content people will begin to switch or drop other services.

        Apple has one problem that they need to get past internally. ‘Family Friendly’

        If historically you look at HBO, one of the reasons their series dominated was they were adult shows, with language and nudity allowed. Netflix followed that model and excelled with some top shows.

        Not saying Family entertainment isn’t good/needed, but If Apple rates everything PG/G they will fail.

  1. A much higher percentage than reported will subscribe to AppleTV+, since the first year is free with the purchase of an Apple device. Disney will also get more Netflix subscribers once new Marvel and Star Wars content goes live on their service, and the existing content gets yanked from Netflix.

  2. Well consider that some Netflix users may not have Apple products and therefore not be able to use AppleTV+.
    For $60 a year I will be signing up for ATV+. As it happens will be getting a new iPhone so will wait for November and get the service free for a year.

      1. “Yeah, isn’t Apple’s market share 20-ish% from a recent non-monopoly article? So it makes sense that 75% are not going to subscribe.”

        Excellent example of journalism in action. In the report Piper Jaffrey’s chart showed two data points: those who will and those who won’t.

        CNBC headlined the “those who won’t” data point, ignoring the 25% “those who will” data point. The full article shows the subject survey base included 1,500 respondents, of which 23% said they would subscribe to Apple TV+. That’s important, because if the sample is applied to Netflix’s total paid subscriber base it means that 34.730 million Netflix subscribers will subscribe to Apple TV+.

        That’s a pretty incredible number considering that nobody has seen any content from Apple at this point.

        Understanding media reporting on suveys and such, you have to look at what they don’t tell you, as well as what they do tell you.

        BTW, 34 million Apple TV+ subscriber (from Netflix’s base alone) generates ~$2 Billion in revenue per year.

  3. I get what you’re saying MDN, but this is different than the iPod. The iPod was ground breaking in conjunction with iTunes. People who have Netflix already understand streaming and are for the most part satisfied with Netflix.

    No one is going to pay for…

    Netflix and Apple and Disney and HBO and HULU and APPLE music and Pandora and DC and Apple News and Apple Arcade And CBS while still paying for Internet and regular cable and all the other up and coming channels.

    I’ll stick with Netflix and iTunes Store.

  4. I will be getting the free 1 year subscription to TV+ but there is nothing I’ve seen that suggests it’s trying to replace Netflix. In fact Apple has said it is positioned more like HBO. The fact that they will be releasing shows one episode at a time is the clearest indication that Apple is not trying to supplant Netflix…at least not yet. Another example — Apple offers supplemental tv channels, Netflix does not. Apple’s strategy is a hybrid. The problem with the survey is that they are comparing Apples with oranges – another dumb analyst creating unecessary FUD.

    Regardless, TV and video are broken. Will be years before this mess is sorted out and the last companies standing will be able to put something cohesive together that is good for consumers.

  5. I have zero interest in tech company cable TV, including Apple. Disney can burn for its own reasons. Granted, I don’t subscribe to Netflix, either. This has always presented itself as a race to the bottom to me in terms of content, if not profit, and the irony that tech companies themselves turned out to be the real corporate goons and have ended up perpetrating the cable-ization of the web is too much. Ajit isn’t the only idjit in this scenario. I’ll pass on all of ’em.

  6. 20% defection from Netflix to either Disney or Apple would be a disaster for Netflix.

    And, remember those questions are separate- 18% of Netflix could go to Disney and ANOTHER 18% could go to Apple.

  7. Even if Netflix subscribers don’t defect, those other streaming services could easily take a chunk out of Netflix’s subscriber growth and that’s what Netflix is mainly being valued for. I doubt Netflix is that good where other streaming services are not worthy competitors. I have to laugh at how analysts quickly dismiss Apple or Disney’s chances, considering those companies have much deeper pockets than Netflix. Both of those companies can easily afford to buy extra content the same way Netflix has been doing.

  8. On a side note, I’m pissed at Sling TV for taking hockey away, specifically fox sports west and prime ticket. SOB I’ll never go back to cable or satellite. Stupid idiots (sling + fox) and their temper tantrums. Git it fixed , dammit.

  9. I am afraid to say, the approach is all wrong it’s been done before and failed. Customers want choice, and while you can subscript to different providers, at come point it becomes cost prohibitive.
    The expectation is that a Customer will sign for a few channels, on each provider.

    In the UK Sky had the Monopoly with Sports, with the adoption of BT sports and others, their market share reduced significantly – £30 for all matches became £30+£25.

    If I were to average my watching, it would be SKY+BT+Amazon+Netflix+Apple TV+ Disney
    This will become a huge overhead, and come down to who offers the best Combined package at the best price.

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