Over 40 companies to back Apple vs. U.S. government overreach; beleaguered Samsung still thinking about it

“Apple and the FBI are set to start its court battle for the San Bernardino case in a couple of weeks, March 22nd,” Benjamin Mayo reports for 9to5Mac.

“In support for Apple’s position, over 40 companies, organizations and individuals will file amicus briefs later today to rally against the government order for Apple to compromise its own iPhone security measures,” Mayo reports. “Facebook, Google, Dropbox, Microsoft, Snapchat and more will sign on to briefs in the case, according to sources.”

Various “company execs were initially worried about the consequences on the industry if Apple lost out to the FBI,” Mayo reports citing The New York Times. “Bloomberg reports Samsung supports the idea of encryption but will not commit to file an amicus brief for its smartphone rival, the Samsung statement said it remains undecided on its court position. The New York Times says the breadth of support Apple has received is unusual for court action, a significant sign of a unified Silicon Valley position… which can ultimately sway the final decision in Apple’s favour.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Nice to see that beleaguered Samsung is as sackless as ever.

SEE ALSO:
Apple posts amicus briefs in support of Apple vs. U.S. government overreach – March 3, 2016
U.S. Defense Secretary says strong encryption essential to national security, not a believer in back doors – March 3, 2016
Apple digs in for long fight against U.S. government overreach: ‘There is no middle ground’ – March 3, 2016
ACLU, other privacy groups urge U.S. judge to support Apple vs. U.S. government in iPhone case – March 2, 2016
Apple scored the knockout punch against FBI in House Judiciary Committee hearing – March 2, 2016
Within an hour of Malaysia Flight 370 disappearing, Apple was working with officials to locate it – March 2, 2016
John McAfee reveals how the FBI can unlock an iPhone in 30 minutes – March 2, 2016
Can the FBI force a company to break into its own products? No, says U.S. Magistrate – March 2, 2016
Apple CEO Cook decried Obama’s ‘lack of leadership’ on encryption during a closed-door meeting last month – February 29, 2016
Obama administration set to expand sharing of data that N.S.A. intercepts – February 28, 2016
Apple’s fight with U.S. could speed development of devices impervious to government intrusion – February 24, 2016
Petition asks Obama administration to stop demanding Apple create iPhone backdoor – February 19, 2016
Obama administration claims FBI is not asking Apple for a ‘backdoor’ to the iPhone – February 18, 2016
Obama administration wants access to smartphones – December 15, 2015
Obama administration war against Apple just got uglier – July 31, 2015
Obama’s secret attempt to ban cellphone unlocking, while claiming to support it – November 19, 2013

12 Comments

    1. All other things aside, an understanding of how business works in Korea helps you to understand why Samsung hasn’t taken a stand. I don’t think it’s particularly a Samsung thing, rather, it’s a case of how you need to cooperate with government in Korea to achieve success. The K-gov’t still actively performs censorship of websites, for example.

      It’s just how it works. Obviously, many Americans would feel disgusted by such a thing, but hey… different culture, different rules.

      1. ” you need to cooperate with government”

        and Vice Versa

        the President of Korea pardoned Chairman Lee of Samsung when he was sentenced to jail for criminal charges.

  1. Samesung will again eventually copy Apple, but only after their marketing group can rebrand “customer data security” with a new name so they can claim they were innovative and invented it first.

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