Tim Cook mocked after inexplicably posting blurry Super Bowl iPhone photo to Twitter

“Tim Cook, who runs one of the world’s most important companies and does not need this crap from any of you, is getting roasted after posting a wild, out-of-focus shot on Twitter [last] night at the end of Super Bowl 50,” Casey Newton reports for The Verge.

“Presumably shot with an iPhone, the photo shows what appears to be the aftermath of Super Bowl 50, in which people on the field are being showered with confetti, or maybe nerve gas,” Newton reports. “It’s not totally clear.”

Newton reports, “‘Shot with iPhone,’ quote-tweeted a bunch of jackals, after Cook shared his blurry photo from the 20-yard line of Levi’s Stadium.”

https://twitter.com/andykoh_/status/696574550193135616

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: First off, we’ll critique this photo from a fine arts perspective: Cook’s photo captures the moment effectively: From start to finish, the Super Bowl is vibrant, alive, and colorful. There is no law that says “focus” is a necessary element of a work of art. Focus is but one element of a photo, it can be rendered in any degree. Cook’s only fault was posting this painterly image on Twitter instead of in a gallery.

Of course, the great unwashed Android settlers think sharp focus is what makes a great photograph. They only mock Cook’s image due to their lack of a fine arts education and blatant lack of taste (look no further than the fact that they carry knockoff iPhones).

That said, you can’t run a “Shot on iPhone” campaign and then post this sort of photo to Twitter. Well you can, but this type of reaction is what you get.

Should Apple PR be charged with approving Tim Cook’s tweets prior to posting?

27 Comments

  1. Geez. People paid by MSoft, Samsung, Carl Icahn, Foxconn, and LG have come up with a great we hate Tim campaign. I sure the Tim hater’s that post here get their check each month. All he does is make Apple money. A hell of a lot of money, in fact. That is his job. He doing it better that anyone else. Yet the hate machine has not been called out.

  2. “Look, we get it. You’ve never posted a bad photo online, and now Tim Cook has. You have won this day. You and the Denver Broncos. Go take a Gatorade bath. Send us the pictures.”

    Comment from the article says it all.

  3. Apparently, this shot was taken from behind a glass window of his luxury multi-million dollar suite. But when you are CEO of Apple you should know what happens to such shots. They are blurry and have glass reflection. This confirms the impression that TC does not pay attention to details. That explains the current state of Apple software and hardware.

  4. Maybe we’ll here that the shot was actually from a great distance in a fast moving vehicle. Anyway, who cares. I have my 6’s camera and get great shots. I would like more manual controls.

  5. “MacDailyNews Take: First off, we’ll critique this photo from a fine arts perspective: Cook’s photo captures the moment effectively: From start to finish, the Super Bowl is vibrant, alive, and colorful. There is no law that says “focus” is a necessary element of a work of art. Focus is but one element of a photo, it can be rendered in any degree.”

    I cannot imagine a single situation where MDN would let a blurry out of focus photograph from any Samsung phone go without considerable criticism. What if it was from Sony, or LG, or a Microsoft Lumia phone? They would be lambasted and ridiculed too. I guess Apple and Tim Cook get a biased pass from MDN on this one.

    1. MDN won’t admit that it’s just a shitty photo. The one face we can see is what looks like a security or PR guy walking with his hands in his pockets, there is nothing “vibrant” about it. Cook is at least 15 yards from where any of the action is and he has a big empty space right in front of him. I don’t expect him to be a great photographer, but if anyone other than Cook posted this photo it would be seen as shitty by Apple and Android fans alike.

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