Android fanboy actually uses an iPhone for 2 months, dumps Android phone

“I wrote perhaps my most popular blog post ever just over 2 months ago. I talked about how I bought, used, and subsequently didn’t like the iPhone 6. I would be sticking with Android… or so I thought,” developer Joe Casabona blogs. “Shortly after that post got popular, I was compelled to take another look at iOS.”

“There were 2 factors in my first trial with the iPhone that stacked the odds against me ever liking the device. I wasn’t using it as my only full time device, and I didn’t use all the features,” Casabona explains. “The first factor made my user experience with the iPhone more like this: ‘Ugh. I don’t like this; I’m just going to do it on my Android phone.’ That means I never used the iPhone enough to not have a frustrating (read: different from Android) experience. The second factor was the real kicker. I was excluding the features that make using iOS great. I didn’t turn on iMessage. I wasn’t using Passbook or Apple Pay. Handoff was something that was hands-off for me (pun totally intended).”

“After 2 months fully immersed iPhone usage, I’m confident that this will be my primary device,” Casabona explains. “I’ve been an Android user and a big voice for the Android Army since the first devices were available. I will still have Android devices too; I need them for testing. But for every day use, I will be making the switch to the iPhone.”

“This has been a strange experience for me. I’ve been such an outspoken proponent of Android. It was more like anti-iPhone. That means making the switch has been one of begrudging acceptance. At first, I didn’t like that I liked it,” Casabona confesses. “But as I use the iPhone more and see how well it actually works, it’s clear that Android is great for some things. But needs to mature in other aspects.”

Much more in the full article – recommended – here.

MacDailyNews Take: Funny thing about Apple products, from the Mac to iPhone to iPad to Apple Watch: Once you actually, really, truly use them, if you’re right in the head, you’ll never go back to the dreadful experience of Windows PCs or Android phones, tablets, and stupidwatches.

SEE ALSO:
Apple iPhone sees highest switching rate from Android ever recorded – August 10, 2015
Nomura ups Apple to ‘Buy’ on strong iPhone growth, increasing Android switchers – July 31, 2015
Significant Android to iPhone switching weakens market for Samsung Galaxy S6 – March 24, 2015
Analyst: Android switchers fueling iPhone growth; Android users even more interested in Apple Watch than iOS users – March 23, 2015
Over 85% of new iPhone sales are switchers, mostly from Android – January 30, 2015

15 Comments

  1. I don’t have an android phone. Well not that I use. But I have both Windows and Macs. And I feel comfortable in both worlds. My daily drivers are Macs. I do DO feel safer on a Mac. With Windows I don’t feel handicapped that there was just that one thing I can’t do, and then, vise versa.

    I do, love my Mac and iPhone.

    One insecure Windows is enough for me and Android would be simple my too much anxiety.

    1. Another method is available to Mac Owners for Secure Windows.

      Make Windows really secure by loading it in Boot Camp, doing all the needed updates and Appl installs and then turning off all networking & never turn it on again.

  2. When I first got a Mac it was a powerbook that I bought as my first laptop nominally to replace an ageing Dell desktop. I had an iPod but at the time was using it on windows with music match. It was great, but I wasn’t sure about going Mac, but figured that if I didn’t want it as my main machine it was still portable and I could still use my Dell. Less than a week later the Dell was discarded. Ever since I have had a Mac Mini, three iMacs (two still in use), bought my mother a MacBook Air, changed all my work computers to Mac Minis, and bought 4 iPhones. Just using a Mac for a week made Apple a lot of money.

  3. I’ve had the 3 of them: Android, Windows Phone and iPhone. In that order, since I got what my carried gave me for the lowest price or the offer at the time. Since I always carry my Mac and iPad (eventually an iPod Touch), I never really had a need for an iPhone.

    The Android experience was dreadful. I hated it. I know it got better, but back then (2.5 years ago) it was so painful, the only thing I used the phone for was to talk and to tether. Battery life was to cry for.

    The Windows Phone was not bad at all. It’s way better than the Android experience. The phone itself was great for the price, and battery life was really good. Windows 8.1 was much more comprehensive than Android. I was surprised Microsoft released a very decent product. Integration with my Mac was acceptable, but the lack of some of my favorite apps (plus the store mess) and iTunes integration (for my purchased music) was something I really missed.

    I just got my first iPhone and it’s a blessing. Handoff is amazing. Integration is amazing. The phone itself is amazing. Apps ar beautiful, the screen is awesome. I can’t be happier.

    It’s a no brainer why the iPhone is the absolute leader.

  4. This guy is a total douche-bag for not recognizing, and not disclosing, these critical limitations of his so-called “test” of iPhone.

    Though I give him credit for having the balls to admit it when he finally figured it out.

    Wonder how many other knee-jerk Android fans are out there? They say it is easier to convert a zealot than a reasonable person. Sounds like iPhone has a lot of potential new zealots once the fAndroids figure it out.

  5. As I’ve been pointing out this week, there’s a whole new reason to dump at least certain Android devices this week. So sad:

    HTC caught storing fingerprints AS WORLD- READABLE CLEARTEXT
    Android biometric banks more Fort Nope than Fort Knox.

    Four FireEye researchers have found a way to steal fingerprints from Android phones packing biometric sensors such as the Samsung Galaxy S5 and the HTC One Max.

    The team found a forehead-slapping flaw in HTC One Max in which fingerprints are stored as an image file (dbgraw.bmp) in a open “world readable” folder.

    “Any unprivileged processes or apps can steal user’s fingerprints by reading this file,” the team says, adding that the images can be made into clear prints by adding some padding.

    And it gets worse… Not that FUD is required.

      1. That’s up to Apple. But I’ve rarely seen them be directly confrontational with another company, even the total scum, without bringing in the law. Rhetorical warz are not Apple’s style. They aren’t a bitchy company. Apple is a professional company. Samsung is bitchy. Let them wreck their reputation being bitchy.

  6. Anecdotal evidence is subjective and invalid. When anecdotal evidence consists of one data point real analysis is impossible to be made. None of what is reported comes close to authentic, unbiased, and powerful analysis. Of course, this doesn’t prevent fanboys from generating their fantasies.

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