Apple’s new TV spot “Echoes” featuring U2, iTunes and iPhone 6 goes into heavy rotation

Apple yesterday debuted their new TV spot “Echoes” on U.S. broadcast and cable TV networks. Today, the ad placements increased at least six-fold. It’ll likely become difficult for TV viewers to miss this spot in the coming days.

Apple’s YouTube description for the ad reads:

U2 and Apple team up for the world’s largest album release ever as U2 thrashes forward with music that confronts innocence and forges immortality.

The ad features U2 playing their new song “The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)” in silhouette with images of the Ramones superimposed within the silhouettes. The ad announces the availability of U2’s new album, “Songs of Innocence,” currently free to all iTunes users, and closes on a hand clutching Apple’s all-new iPhone 6 held high:

Direct link to video here.

Related articles:
Some iTunes users upset over Apple’s U2 album giveaway – September 11, 2014
Apple and U2 release ‘Songs of Innocence’ exclusively for iTunes Store customers – September 9, 2014

31 Comments

    1. In many ways, the work of a critic is easy. We risk very little, yet enjoy a position over those who offer up their work and their selves to our judgment. We thrive on negative criticism, which is fun to write and to read. But the bitter truth we critics must face is that, in the grand scheme of things, the average piece of junk is probably more meaningful than our criticism designating it so. But there are times when a critic truly risks something, and that is in the discovery and defense of the new. The world is often unkind to new talent, new creations. The new needs friends.

      1. Just woke up, with a cup of coffee, and sat before my iMac sipping on my coffee and the first words were reading your comment. It’s truly brilliant and true of course.
        Is it your thinking? Well, really doesn’t matter, it’s brilliant and shows a rich compassion and understanding towards others and a true righteous fighting spirit in defense of beauty and innovation. I am truly inspired and thankful to waking up to your words. Thank you.

        1. They are good words, but they have taken from the Disney movie Ratatouille. Plagiarism must be spreading further than South Korea. My friend send me a photo of the YBM ripoff in SK, anyone else see this?

            1. pretentious

              I arrive at that conclusion — that word — often. However, I also find that it is overused and, as often as not, a cruel and jealous reaction by those who can’t stomach the idea that someone else in the world may have had a moment of clarity or creativity that deserves to be called “brilliant.”

              Just because these words were written by a person who was ultimately creating a Disney movie for kids doesn’t make them any less true — nor pretentious. I remember watching it with my kids, and as I recall the reaction I had was that they were truly unexpected. That’s art, man.

              Merely my opinion, of course.

    1. I agree, although I haven’t given a hoot for U2 for a long time. Their appearance at the keynote seemed to work out well and I think the free album is a pretty good move on Apple’s part.

    1. This is actually genius. Apple’s target market is all the young adults that grew up with the iPod and are all grown up now, with disposable income of their own. I bet if you ask, you will find that an overwhelming majority of android owners have owned an iPod at some point. By calling to this crowd, Apple is attempting to lure all those folks back to Apple’s (much better) side of the house by reminding them of the great times they had with their iPod.

    1. I’m glad they’ve managed to last all this time. They still turn a decent tune. One of my brothers points out that music since the 1980s pretty much drove itself into a ditch of dull corporate crappiness. These days we have revivals of loads of old new wave bands specifically because the audience wants to hear something fun and well done again. My brother laments for the kids these days. Where is ‘THEIR’ music? What is their music movement? Retro? Seriously? It can’t be that creativity is dead all of a sudden. The late 1960s through the 1980s was a period of INTENSE creativity! Why doesn’t it continue on today? Why all the 4×4 formula boredom tunes?

      I personally point directly into the face of the idiotic music industrialists who killed their golden goose with a vengeance. They laid down the hammer and smashed creativity to pulp pop pablum. Well done, you 20th century larcenous Luddites. The sooner the old guard is overthrown, the sooner we can get on with real NEW MUSIC.

      1. I would extend your period of intense creativity to the early 60’s on the front side to the 90’s on the backside. In fact, the 90’s was one of the richest decades of all for great rock n roll, followed closely by the 70’s.

        1. I have to plead guilty to having tunnel hearing due to my experiences in the 1960s and 1990s. In the early 60s I had very little exposure to pop music as I was a little kid. In the 1990s my head was buried in computer tech and not particularly alert to the Seattle music movement, etc.

          Speaking of Seattle, I’m pleased with the new music coming out of that general area and culture lately. I’m a massive fan of Wild Nothing and Still Corners sound. We have a local tea lounge that joyfully exposes me to that recent genre of music.

    2. I agree. Name for me one band that has emerged in the last 15 years that will sell out 60,000 seat stadiums 10 or 15 years years from now. Thats what u2 does after 30 years of touring.

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