The death of BlackBerry-maker RIM

Parallels Desktop 6 for Mac “A friend just asked me if I was on BBM. That’s BlackBerry Messenger for the uninitiated,” Bob Lefsetz writes for The Big Picture. “And many may never be initiated, because BlackBerry is so 2001. Or 5. Or maybe even 6 or 7, but certainly not 11.”

“BlackBerries do one thing incredibly well, process e-mail,” Lefsetz writes. “And that’s it.”

Lefsetz writes, “If you think BlackBerries surf the Web well, then you don’t, or have never used an iPhone.”

“Make a great tune and it lasts forever,” Lefsetz writes. “A mediocre, trend-following track may be a hit today, but it’s as useless in the future as a Motorola StarTac.”

“I know, I know, you’re Canadian, you beat your chest for RIM,” Lefsetz writes. “But it’s over.”

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: As we wrote back on August 05, 2010: RIM. Dead company walking.

37 Comments

  1. I’m Canadian and I only beat my check for one company, and an American company at that! Apple all the way!

    RIM has always been too arrogant and too focused on the corporate world to survive at the “personal” level.

  2. Beat my “chest”, that is…. stupid MDN and being unable to edit posts… grrr. And being unable to post more than once a minute… grrr x 2!! MDN trots innovation, but their commenting system is straight out of 1985!

  3. I’m a long time fan of all things Apple but I like my blackberry better for these reasons:

    1) They come with trackpads where you can easily mouse over to links and click on them.
    2) It has a keyboard and I can easily read email and the web with one hand (most of the time). It’s hard to do this with a touchscreen.

    It is true that browsing on a blackberry is not all that great. But for me, it’s more than good enough.

    If Apple wants me to buy a phone from them, it’ll have to come with a trackpad and a keyboard (and not one of those sideways sliding out keyboards as those require two hands to use).

  4. @BMWTwisty:

    Using one analyst’s comments (or even several) and one day’s stock market results (thus far) has no bearing on a company’s ability to compete or outperform its competition. Investors, particularly large investors, really don’t care about the companies they’re investing in or what products they make, only that they will be able to realize the return they want in the time frame they want. If the company can’t do that, for whatever reason, then its shares won’t be bought and the price will go down.

    Take Apple’s decline today. That certainly doesn’t mean that Apple had peaked, and that the company is doomed to failure. What its decline today means is that more people think Apple is priced a bit too high, or that they are selling to take their profits, than those who are buying. Period.

    RIM may be up simply because it was deemed to be undervalued, and that its announcement of the new tablet will give a temporary boost to the stock, thus a profit making opportunity. Nothing more, nothing less.

    Large investors whose purchases affect market results and trends don’t buy a company’s shares because they like the product. They buy because they can, one way or another, make money off of buying, holding or selling the company’s shares. The company’s products only matter to the extent it permits the large investor to realize its goals.

  5. As for Android, the majority are buying the phone that they like. It happens to be Android which is a direct build to emulate iOS.

    Those that have purchased the iPhone have typically purchased it because of the iOS. The iPhone is one model- like it or leave it.

    If any one Android phone out sales the only model that Apple makes- please state that one model. Then again, what will happen when Apple starts to make various models for other demographic price ranges and domestic GSM, CDMA, or 4G with all carriers? Ummmm, Android may have a fight to hold to any gains made.

    Then again, make one android model and put that against the iPhone. That will be interesting

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