Why Apple will dominate the next era of computing

“No matter how cool [Apple’s iPhone] exchange support and the enterprise play is, that news is dwarfed by the other, much more important announcement – the iPhone SDK. The powerful platform that Apple uses to create beautiful applications for MacOS and iPhone is now completely open,” Alex Iskold writes for ReadWriteWeb. “This platform is a game changer.”

“Since the early days, Apple embraced a language called Objective-C – an object-oriented flavor of the popular procedural language. When Jobs returned to Apple, one of the early smart decisions was to ditch the old operating system in favor of Unix,” Iskold writes.

MacDailyNews Take: Actually, that’s why Apple bought Steve Jobs’ NeXT; for the Unix-based OS. So, the decision actually predates Jobs’ return, although, obviously, it was Jobs who somehow convinced dumbass Gil Amelio to do something completely different for once and actually make a smart decision.

Iskold continues, “This move allowed Apple to instantly tap into serious programmers while retaining a beautiful and simple UI… Smart, disciplined and mature.”

“Not all platforms are made equal,” Iskold writes. “First compare this offering with what Microsoft offered for Windows a while back. Redmond’s convoluted APIs, COM, OLE, and ActiveX still make developers shake their heads. Instead of cultivating elegance and simplicity, Microsoft pushed for complexity. Why? Because it kept exclusivity, kept people learning new weird stuff, kept people getting new certifications. But Apple’s culture and code is rooted in elegance and extreme simplicity.”

Iskold writes, “Apple has made this play flawlessly. The enterprise and SDK solutions will go hand-in-hand to propel the iPhone to be THE handheld device of the future. Ironically, the PC just got its final blow not from a MacBook (which has been on the rise too!), but from a small new computer. Apple got its revenge elegantly, relentlessly and creatively. The next era of computing will be dominated by Apple. Is this a good thing? Likely yes, and it is surely better than one dominated by Microsoft.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “since1985” for the heads up.]

MacDailyNews Take: “Why would he do that? He has to know that he can never win.” – Bill Gates on Steve Jobs’ return to Apple, as told to Robert X. Cringely during an unpublished 1999 interview for Vanity Fair.

72 Comments

  1. it sure looks like Apple has won, and in this era they have in personal computing.

    But I still feel something biting my hair, when it comes to the lack of competition.

    I have a gut feeling that acer, asus, hp/compaq are getting together to create a new operating system that is seperated from Microsoft. Is it really that hard? Not really, they have so much cash, and theres so many Software engineering students whom have completed courses in OS … but end up twiddling their fingers with fixing up bugs from a website written in Java, and being paid penuts.

    I’d probably bet on HP doing it first.

  2. I think that, more than competting with Microsoft, Apple competes with itself.
    To compete with others leads to be barely better than competition. Compete with oneself leads to be better every day in every way compared with oneself, so it pushes up always.

    Apple: Good fruit company

    Microsoft: Shit happens

    And that’s all I have to say about that.

  3. MDN, how do you find this nonsense? This guy is obviously blogging from a psych ward in Cupertino. 97.5% of the world’s computer users remain super-passionate about using Windows and for good reason. Developers have been generating fantastic software built around Microsoft’s meticulous, friendly and open tools. Who’s gonna write software for the 2.5% of proprietary expensive computers out there?

    Microsoft won, Apple lost. Now we can move on to how the Zune will destroy the I-Pod.

    Your potential. Our passion.™

  4. @bioness,

    Does that mean we’re going back to the days of Radio Shack computers, and every maker doing their own OS?

    My gut feeling is, if there are any new desktop OSes, they’ll be from China. Both as an attempt to prove their coding prowess, and to separate themselves from the American-headed systems.

  5. Compete with oneself leads to be better every day in every way compared with oneself, so it pushes up always.

    Not always. Look at some select automakers for a case in point.

    Bad the notion you just gotta deploy the same vehicle, as several models across several brands, into the same competing market segment. Oh, then offer deep incentives to move these vehicles. WTF?!? It’s like Apple from the Performa/Centris/Quadra days.

    Maybe the key is to compete with yourself, while not competing against

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