Wal-Mart axes HD DVD, to sell Blu-ray players exclusively

“Wal-Mart Stores announced on Friday morning that it, too, has chosen a side in the battle for high-definition video supremacy: by June, it will stock only Blu-ray Disc players,” Erica Ogg reports for CNET.

“A buyer in Wal-Mart’s video division wrote this morning on her Wal-Mart Checkout blog that the retail giant had made the decision following Netflix and Best Buy’s high-profile announcements that they will exclusively stock Blu-ray products,” Ogg reports.

“While Netflix and Best Buy were pretty damning evidence that the end was near, now it’s glaringly obvious: it’s over for HD DVD,” Ogg reports.

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Adam W.” for the heads up.]

21 Comments

  1. It’s NOT over.

    The Windows market share alone will be all it takes to propel HD DVD well into the future—blazing past Blu-Ray. Add to that Microsoft’s high threshold for quality and consumer-focused DRM technologies and even a MAC lemming will see Blu-Ray doesn’t have a chance.

    In the name of all things right and just Microsoft must prevail. Redmond, you are the only hope for consumers worldwide. Save us. Save us now. I can’t bear the thought of Microsoft not being involved in HD content delivery.

    Your potential. Our passion.™

  2. For the record, Apple was backing both formats. But having Wal-mart take sides is as damning as it comes. Expect Toshiba to stop funding this dying horse soon. The format war was a good thing while it lasted because it drop prices down. Now consumers should feel comfortable to Blu-ray and as demand goes up, production costs will go down. Then I might be able to afford a high definition system by 2015.

  3. Just to make sure we all understand this; format wars are NEVER good for the consumers. When there is ONE format, manufacturers compete for their market share with features and price. When there are TWO formats, there are two market spaces with half the potential for profits. Those who want to compete in both spaces have to either build two separate lines of products, or build a hybrid product (if applicable), or bet on one format ultimately winning and ignore the other half of the market.

    We are all still suffering the consequences of a stalemate between DVD-R and DVD+R (and RW). These discs would have ultimately be even cheaper (as would have burners) had one single format won out. The prices would have dropped sooner as well.

    Let’s now hope for a rapid decline in prices for players, burners, blank discs and movies on BD.

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