Dvorak: Apple CEO Steve Jobs is dead right about DRM

“Digital rights management (DRM) is an out-and-out disaster both as a concept and as an always changing technology,” John C. Dvorak writes for MarketWatch.

“Most technologists have always believed this and apparently now Steve Jobs is saying it publicly,” Dvorak writes. “He is begging the music industry to give up on all the DRM initiatives while subtly predicting they may spell its doom. He is dead right.”

Dvorak writes, “Jobs is no idiot and after already proving that selling music online is a money-maker you’d think the big labels would pay some attention to him when he tells them to get off this DRM nonsense.”

“Of course they will pay no attention whatsoever,” Dvorak writes.

Dvorak writes, “I would like to finish with the marketing observation that the record industry hates. During the heyday of Napster and open free music sharing and trading, when million of people swapped songs, the CD business was booming. Once Napster was shut down, and along with it the social network of music discovery, sales began to plummet. They are still falling.”

Dvorak writes, “Apparently these people are clueless about their own industry and how it works.”

Full article here.
Fire and brimstone coming down from the skies. Rivers and seas boiling. Forty years of darkness. Earthquakes, volcanoes…The dead rising from the grave. Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together. Mass hysteria. Dvorak making sense. Sheesh, what’s next?

Related article:
Apple CEO Steve Jobs’ posts rare open letter: ‘Thoughts on Music’ – calls for DRM-free music – February 06, 2007

61 Comments

  1. Regardless of why Dvorak says what he says, he’s right about this. Piracy won’t kill the music industry, and DRM couldn’t stop it. One thing that Steve Jobs got wrong was saying that there has never been DRM on a CD. History would point to Sony puting mac and pc compatible root kits on their discs until they were called on it. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  2. “Once Napster was shut down, and along with it the social network of music discovery, sales began to plummet. They are still falling”

    Just one gripe here… this little observation falls down.

    What’s the explanation… that… Napster was turning people onto music and then they’d… share it with their friends (after stealing the music)… then… go pay for it??

    How’s this… “since the Napster p2p fiasco, and the subsequent bittorrent phenomenon, paid media consumption across the board is down. Artists ranging from musicians, to actors and directors have less incentive to do what they do best, and hence, produce less goods/experiences”

    Do you realize it’s been 4 years since Linkin Park put out an album? The first one was a multimillion seller, and the second one was markedly less so (by that time, filesharing was rampant)… god knows the sales of the 3rd one will be a huge disappointment… people will love the album, but many will steal it.

    You just can’t tell me that movie ticket sales and music sales are doing well in any capacity. Beyond the LOTR trilogy, and the odd Sundance film, there has been, effectively nothing out of Hollywood. How do you think they feel about Bittorrent?

    DRM is not the problem. The technology is there to stop crooks, and does NOT affect normal people. I fail to see who is harmed by DRM. The 5% of people who have non-iPod players? They already have many ways to buy music.

    Come on… these are the same geeks whining about bitrates… apparently they’re esteemed enough to demand pristine bitrates, but childish enough to listen to … Bon Jovi and… Enya? (okay, i have no clue what these guys listen to… i just checked Thurrotts list)

    Non-issue, I say.

    Though, for those of you playing at home, there is absolutely NO downside for Steve Jobs… people will keep buying millions of iPods, even if it means loading them with stolen music.

    *shrug

    (I have a lot of CD’s, which are ALSO in my music collection. I also have tons of free music and free movies)

  3. DRM is stupid, it pisses off the legitimate customer (just like the all that security tape that makes it impossible to open a legitimately purchased CD) and does nothing to stop piracy.

    I do like having my name listed in the “Purchased by” field. I bought it and I don’t mind showing it off.

    Oh, I almost forgot, Dvorak is an embarrassment to the journalism community.
    He’s also laughing all the way to the bank.

  4. Napster was all about music discovery, but the labels don’t like you discovering whatever you please. It’s all about forcing consumers to discover the artists they want you to. I used to be a marketing rep for Sony Music and we would spend hundreds of millions of dollars giving away free music samples, but only to select artists.

    I personally used Napster to discover and listen to European artists that I couldn’t even buy here in America if I’d wanted to.

  5. mike:

    “What’s the explanation… that… Napster was turning people onto music and then they’d… share it with their friends (after stealing the music)… then… go pay for it??”

    Yes, after discovering many artists on Napster, I went out and bought their albums after. People still want to compensate artists, own the artwork and liner notes, etc.

    “You just can’t tell me that movie ticket sales and music sales are doing well in any capacity. Beyond the LOTR trilogy, and the odd Sundance film, there has been, effectively nothing out of Hollywood.”

    The reason why there is nothing out of Hollywood is because they have no good ideas. They’re washed up. They’ve tapped nearly every TV show and remake they can think of. The odd Sundance film is good because the independent filmmakers are still coming up with fresh ideas and not using computers to come up with plots for movies.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.