“Rumors that Apple is getting ready to unveil the Apple Watch 2 are nearing fever pitch,” Adrian Kingsley-Hughes writes for ZDNet. “And the top feature it’s predicted to have is cellular connectivity, which will cut the tie with the iPhone.”

“It’s a feature [some – MDN Ed.] people felt the initial Apple Watch was missing,” Kingsley-Hughes writes. “But be careful what you wish for, because once you get this feature, you’ll probably start hating it.”

“The first problem with getting cellular into Apple Watch 2 will be powering it. Cellular takes a lot of power,” Kingsley-Hughes writes. “OK, so you’re not concerned about battery life. Well, how much are you willing to pay for having cellular on your wrist?”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: As we wrote last November:

“Normal” people, non-techies, love their Apple Watches. Some so-called “techie” people act as if they aren’t familiar with the constraints of battery technology or mobile processors (especially in regard to heat dissipation). Many of these same people also seem to have an deep-seated desire for a “Dick Tracy Watch” without ever asking themselves “Why? Why do I want something that was conceived before the Internet and before everyone who’d ever want to wear one had a sophisticated portable pocket computer in their pocket?”

This quest for a “two-way wrist radio” is unending because it’s an outmoded idea and is therefore never coming. People will be wearing “Dick Tracy Hats” en masse before they’re wearing “Dick Tracy Watches.”

People who give up on their Apple Watch generally do so because they simply don’t get it. They approach Apple Watch by trying to shove it into some preconceived idea built upon an idea drawn in a comic strip in the 1940’s. When it doesn’t fit, they give up; their brains seemingly not being malleable enough to use Apple Watch the way it was designed to be used.

Apple Watch users who love their Apple Watches — which is nearly all of them, by the way with Apple Watch satisfaction at an unprecedented 97%, beating the user satisfaction of the original iPhone and iPad — understand.

Everyone else is just on the outside looking in, just like those who were snapping their flip phones closed and muttering to themselves, “my cellphone works fine,” staring blankly as we first generation iPhone owners were already living and working in the future, saving time, up-to-date, at the ready, and with the answers to many, many questions at our fingertips way back in the summer of 2007. The rest of the world would figure it out eventually.