Apple TV+ lands ‘Lady in the Lake’ limited series starring Natalie Portman and Lupita Nyong’o

Apple has given a straight-to-series order for “Lady in the Lake,” a new limited series directed and co-written by Alma Har’el that will co-star Academy Award winners Natalie Portman and Lupita Nyong’o. All three women will serve as executive producers along with Dre Ryan, who will co-create and co-write the series with Har’el, who will write the pilot.

“Lady in the Lake” will star Academy Award winners Natalie Portman and Lupita Nyong’o
“Lady in the Lake” will star Academy Award winners Natalie Portman and Lupita Nyong’o

“Lady in the Lake” is an adaptation of Laura Lippman’s New York Times best-selling novel of the same name. The limited series takes place in ’60s Baltimore, where an unsolved murder pushes housewife and mother Maddie Schwartz (Portman) to reinvent her life as an investigative journalist and sets her on a collision course with Cleo Sherwood (Nyong’o), a hard-working woman juggling motherhood, many jobs and a passionate commitment to advancing Baltimore’s black progressive agenda.

“Lady in the Lake,” produced by Crazyrose and Bad Wolf America, is executive produced by Har’el alongside producing partner Christopher Leggett through her new production company, Zusa. In addition to starring, Portman and Nyong’o will serve as executive producers on the series, alongside Portman’s producing partner Sophie Mas. Crazyrose principals Jean-Marc Vallée and Nathan Ross will also serve as executive producers, and Julie Gardner will executive produce for Bad Wolf America. Author Laura Lippman and Dre Ryan will also executive produce on the project. Endeavor Content is the studio.

“Lady in the Lake” marks Natalie Portman’s first foray into television, as well as Alma Har’el’s first television project. Har’el’s most recent film, “Honey Boy,” won her the Sundance 2019 Special Jury Directing Award for Craft and Vision, received four Independent Spirit Awards nominations including Best Director, and made her the first woman to win the DGA Award for First-Time Feature Film. She is also the first woman in DGA Awards history to be nominated for both commercial directing (2018) and narrative directing (2020).

“Lady in the Lake” joins Apple TV+’s growing roster of award-winning television series, including the Golden Globe and multiple Critics’ Choice Award-winning “Ted Lasso”; Emmy, Critics Choice and SAG award-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated series “The Morning Show”; NAACP Image Award-winning “Truth Be Told”; as well as highly anticipated series including “Physical,” a new dramedy from creator Annie Weisman, and starring and executive produced by Rose Byrne; “Lisey’s Story,” starring and executive produced by Academy Award winner Julianne Moore, created by Stephen King, and executive produced by J.J. Abrams; “The Shrink Next Door,” starring Will Ferrell and Paul Rudd; “WeCrashed,” starring and executive produced by Academy, Golden Globe and SAG Award winners Anne Hathaway and Jared Leto; “Five Days At Memorial” from Academy Award winner John Ridley and Emmy Award winner Carlton Cuse; and “Roar,” a new female-driven anthology series from creators Liz Flahive and Carly Mensch, and executive producers Nicole Kidman and Bruna Papandrea.

Apple TV+ is home to award-winning Apple Originals from today’s most imaginative storytellers. Apple TV+ offers premium, compelling drama and comedy series, feature films, groundbreaking documentaries, and kids and family entertainment, and is available to watch across all your favorite screens. After its launch on November 1, 2019, Apple TV+ became the first all-original streaming service to launch around the world, and has premiered more original hits and received more award recognitions faster than any other streaming service. Apple Originals have been honored with 310 awards nominations and 80 wins in just over a year, including a Golden Globe Award, Critics Choice Awards, Critics Choice Documentary Awards, Daytime and Primetime Emmy Awards, an NAACP Image Award, a Peabody Award and more.

MacDailyNews Note: Apple TV+ is available on the Apple TV app in over 100 countries and regions, on over 1 billion screens, including iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iPod touch, Mac, select Samsung, LG, Sony and VIZIO smart TVs, Amazon Fire TV and Roku devices, Chromecast with Google TV, PlayStation and Xbox consoles, and at tv.apple.com, for $4.99 per month with a seven-day free trial. For a limited time, customers who purchase a new iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, Mac or iPod touch can enjoy one year of Apple TV+ for free. This special offer is good for three months after the first activation of the eligible device.

15 Comments

      1. It’s the illegal fentanyl swallowing that make them uppity.

        FYI, CNN pawn, George Floyd was a criminal who died of a self-induced fatal level of fentanyl. He did not die from a by-the-book neck restraint.

        George Floyd died as the result of a self-administered overdose of fentanyl.

        The cops arrived, so he stupidly swallowed the evidence.

        Dumb ass #FentanylFloyd literally drowned himself.

        Release the persecuted cops now.

        Medical examiner’s memorandum on Floyd’s toxicology report proves cause of death to be drug overdose, not murder

        Medical Examiner Concluded George Floyd Likely Died Of Fentanyl Overdose, Court Docs Reveal

        1. If you are going to comment on what a medical examiner says, learn to read a standard autopsy report. I read several every week for nearly thirty years. The reports on George Floyd (there were at least three of them) agreed that the proximate cause of his death was the compression of the major blood vessels in his neck. Agreed, as in ALL of them said that he would not have died when and where he did but for the neck compression.

          Was he in poor health? Yes. Would he have died then and there from those preexisting conditions? No. Was he using drugs? Yes. Would that, by itself, have killed him at that time and place? The reports agree: No, that was only a contributing factor, not the immediate cause of death.

          The furthest that any of the three pathologists who actually examined the body was willing to go in any other direction was one who said that he probably would have gone with a drug overdose finding if there had not been evidence to the contrary… which there was—multiple videos and witness statements documenting the nine-minute neck compression that continued for minutes after Floyd lost consciousness and for almost an additional minute after someone told the officer that the subject had no pulse.

          A “contributing cause” in a medical context is completely different from a “proximate cause” in a legal sense. If you stab a hemophiliac who bleeds to death, the autopsy and death certificate will list clotting disorder as a contributing condition, but the manner of death will be listed as homicide. When you perform an act that is clearly dangerous to human life and somebody dies, it is not a legal or moral excuse to claim that you did not know that they were more vulnerable than most people are.

          1. So, in other words, the standard way to detain him (as used by many police departments) ended up killing him BECAUSE of other factors that would normally not kill someone who wasn’t OD’ing on fentanyl…Right?

            Yes, it is..but you just took a political way around the facts to make it appear otherwise.

            Anything to fan the flames of racism.
            What a load of shit you are.
            I feel sorry for the district you milked for those 30 years.

            1. Constricting the major blood vessels in the neck might have been used by some police agencies, but only as a means to subdue a subject. No police agency— not “many” or even some— authorized the prolonged use of the maneuver on someone who does not need subduing because he is unconscious. No reasonable person could regard that as necessary force. Any reasonable person would recognize the danger of causing death or serious injury.

              Just because that conduct would not have killed a strong healthy individual (if that is even true) does not change the fact that 50% of the population are in less than average health. Something that only kills people half the time is still deadly force, and deadly force is never justified except to counter a threat of deadly force. Something that only kills people who are intoxicated on alcohol or drugs is unacceptable when it is mostly used on people who require subduing because they are intoxicated. Again, killing someone who is vulnerable is still killing.

              As any pathologist or coroner knows, when somebody dies as a result of the deliberate act of another human being, that is homicide and not an accident (whether the homicide might be justified is not a medical issue). That is the case here, as every pathologist who actually examined the body agreed. Any other pathologist (other than perhaps a paid defense expert witness) would also call this a homicide. They would do so regardless of the races of the subject and the killer, so there is no racism involved.

              You needn’t feel sorry for my county. They had a lawyer who was good enough to be repeatedly invited to provide training for coroners at the state level. What are your professional qualifications in this field?

            2. Fentanyl Floyd was not choked to death. He was not asphyxiated. He was not killed by Chauvin’s knee on the side of his neck. An autopsy showed Floyd’s neck muscles were not even bruised.

              Fentanyl Floyd died when his heart stopped. Yet, he was already suffering from an enlarged heart with constricted arteries, one of five of which was 90% blocked and two others were 75% blocked.

              An autopsy found heavy concentrations of fentanyl in Floyd’s system and traces of methamphetamines. If Fentanyl Floyd had collapsed and died in the street while being wrested into the squad car, his death would have been attributed to a drug overdose and a bad heart.

              Floyd had passed out in the car before the cops arrived. And the arresting cops claim he was foaming at the mouth before being restrained.

              Fentanyl Floyd’s death was not caused by the knee on his neck but by the battered condition of his heart, the near-lethal dose of fentanyl in his system, and his anxiety and panic at being arrested and fearing, under the drugs’ influence, that he was going to be shot.

              How could Chauvin, who arrived late to the scene, know Floyd was a drug addict with a serious heart condition and a large amount of fentanyl in his system, before using the restraint technique of sitting on him and putting a knee on the side of his neck?

              What was Chauvin trying to do when he arrived to see two rookie cops trying to cope with a powerfully built, six-foot-four-inch, 220-pound man violently resisting arrest?

              Is placing a knee on the side of the neck an outlawed or a prohibited procedure for police to use to restrain a suspect violently resisting arrest, as a chokehold is in some precincts?

              No.

              Or is it a procedure some police use legally at times?

              Yes.

              The Minneapolis PD training materials include information on the “maximal restraint technique” used on Fentanyl Floyd., including a photo of an officer with a knee on a suspect’s neck, exactly the hold used by Chauvin.

              Fentanyl Floyd is dead due to his own poor choices and wasted life.

              If Chauvin is correctly exonerated, it could trigger a riot like those that plagued the city through the summer of 2020. Will Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and the usual suspects to denounce the mob and stand up unequivocally for the rule of law?

              Don’t hold your breath. 🙂

            3. Facts are certainly fun (!), but only if they are true. The “facts” you have presented are either questionable or irrelevant. Yes, if Floyd had collapsed on the street, the pathologists would have found that he died from something other than a chokehold, but he did not collapse on the street. The chokehold happened, and the video shows clearly that it caused him to lose consciousness and — more importantly — that it was continued for minutes after he passed out and therefore no longer needed restraint. At that point, the knee on his neck passed from being justified restraint (if it ever was) to unjustified force. When someone, even a peace officer, applies potentially deadly force and someone dies as a result, that is homicide. The police are not empowered to summarily execute citizens for committing a $20 property crime.

              Sorry, but I trust the opinions of all the qualified forensic pathologists who actually performed postmortem examinations more than I trust your opinion.

            4. Again, since, as usual, you addressed none of the salient points:

              Fentanyl Floyd’s death was not caused by the knee on his neck but by the battered condition of his heart, the near-lethal dose of fentanyl in his system, and his anxiety and panic at being arrested and fearing, under the drugs’ influence, that he was going to be shot.

              Is placing a knee on the side of the neck an outlawed or a prohibited procedure for police to use to restrain a suspect violently resisting arrest, as a chokehold is in some precincts?

              No.

              Or is it a procedure some police use legally at times?

              Yes.

              The Minneapolis PD training materials include information on the “maximal restraint technique” used on Fentanyl Floyd., including a photo of an officer with a knee on a suspect’s neck, exactly the hold used by Chauvin.

              Fentanyl Floyd is dead due to his own poor choices and wasted life.

              If Chauvin is correctly exonerated, it could trigger a riot like those that plagued the city through the summer of 2020. Will Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, Nancy Pelosi, Chuck Schumer and the usual suspects to denounce the mob and stand up unequivocally for the rule of law?

              Don’t hold your breath. 🙂

    1. Maybe Apple can do a series on Klacik. But, we all know that won’t happen because she doesn’t fit into the “commitment to advancing Baltimore’s black progressive agenda” agenda.

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