5 reasons why record numbers of Android settlers are upgrading to real iPhones

“Nearly 30 percent of Apple’s 48.04 million iPhones sold in the last quarter went to customers coming from an Android handset. That’s 14 million people new to iOS, helping Apple further build its iPhone base,” Kevin Tofel writes for ZDNet. “But after seven years of Android and eight of iOS, why is that?”

Tofel writes, “There are several reasons that explain the growing rate of Android switchers moving to iPhones, and the first signs actually appeared last year.”

5 reasons why record numbers of Android settlers are upgrading to real iPhones:
1. Bigger iPhones in two choices: 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch iPhones
2. Sharing data between apps: Just tap iOS’ configurable Share button
3. You know what you’re getting with Apple
4. Fast software and security upgrades direct from Apple: That’s a big deal when it comes to security as Google is now realizing
5. It’s still an iOS-first world when it comes to new mobile apps

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: #1 is/was extremely important. #2 isn’t (but it is useful, of course). #3 is overlooked by many, but it’s an important selling point. #4 will only become more important as Android continues to fall fall apart due to a thousand cuts. #5 is not only true, but we can go further and will: iOS apps routinely are more polished and offer more features and better usability than their afterthought Android ports.

If it’s not an iPhone, it’s not an iPhone.

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Apple’s iPhone juggernaut continues with record-breaking sales while Android peddlers fight over scraps – September 28, 2015
Judge Lucy Koh orders Samsung to pay Apple $548 million for patent infringement – September 22, 2015
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Poor man’s iPhone: Android on the decline – February 26, 2015
Study: iPhone users are smarter and richer than those who settle for Android phones – January 22, 2015
Why Android users can’t have the nicest things – January 5, 2015
iPhone users earn significantly more than those who settle for Android phones – October 8, 2014
Yet more proof that Android is for poor people – June 27, 2014
More proof that Android is for poor people – May 13, 2014
Android users poorer, shorter, unhealthier, less educated, far less charitable than Apple iPhone users – November 13, 2013
IDC data shows two thirds of Android’s 81% smartphone share are cheap junk phones – November 13, 2013
CIRP: Apple iPhone users are younger, richer, and better educated than those who settle for Samsung knockoff phones – August 19, 2013

15 Comments

    1. How could that make any sense, James? Ask yourself, if that was true where is the other 70% of SWITCHERS coming from? Blackberry? No, don’t think so? Well, Windows Phone? Again, not likely. There is nothing else to switch from….is there?

  1. I suspect the practical side of Android user switching occurs when the Android user starts using his phone for more than just “phone work.”

    That is when the Android user starts asking iPhone users things like “How do you do that?” and “What app are you using.” and “You mean you can do that on an iPhone?”

  2. Actually the #1 reason is because they notice that all other OEMs are either copying everything Apple does or comparing all their wares with Apple’s. There must be a reason for it?

  3. It’s funny that the first 3 reasons could also be why others don’t switch from Android to iOS:
    1. Bigger iPhones in ONLY two choices: 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch iPhones
    2. Sharing data between apps: Just tap iOS’ configurable Share button. Don’t have to do anything special to share data between apps on Android.
    3. You know what you’re getting with Apple. As well as what you’re NOT getting that may be important to you.

    Number 5 is getting arguable these days and may become more so with Apple’s Swift expanding to enable Android app development.

  4. NOT true.
    It is not 30% of ALL iPhone sales, but only from those upgrading a smartphone, whether that be Android, Windows, BB or Apple.
    Not included are upgrades from a feature phones and first time phone buyers.

    Now it is easy to understand why those are not included?
    The percentages are looking bigger that way. Take into account how many switched from Apple to Android and you will see that meaningful numbers are way lower than 30%. LOL. Stay classy Tim.

    1. Though I would like to agree with you, by the way the article reads it does seem to be 30% of the total 48 million iPhones sold in the quarter are switching from Android handsets. This does not necessarily mean they are new to iOS however. Among them could be users that switch from iOS to Android in the past for one reason or another among of which was screen size. The article also doesn’t cover the number of users that have switched from iOS to Android in the same quarter so in reality the ‘gain’ in users may not be as impressive when you take those users into account. As with many other things, perspective is required.

        1. Reading the article at the link you provided, your reasoning seems sound. Too bad the larger media is assuming the other interpretation. This would also mean that the 70% represents only new iPhone users which is also good news for iOS. The question then is do iPhone users upgrading from an earlier model represent a significant portion of the 30%. The larger their numbers the lower the actual Android switcher count to offset those switching from iOS to Android in the same period.

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