The Darling project attempts to bring OS X apps to Linux

“New life has been breathed into a project to make Apple OS X programs run on Linux-based operating systems,” Nick Heath reports for CNET.

“The Darling project is beginning to see new activity on GitHub after months of dormancy and the website has moved to a new address DarlingHQ.org,” Heath reports. “Similar to how Wine allows Windows applications to run on Linux OS the Darling project is trying to build a software compatibility layer to run OS X apps. The Darling translation layer can currently run a number of OS X console tools and applications, such as Midnight Commander [a visual file manager], and some simple GUI applications with the help of the GNUstep project.”

Heath reports, “Currently Darling won’t run many OS X apps, as the lead developer Luboš Doležel puts it on the project website ‘there is a lot of work ahead of us, but not so much to have usable results.'”

Read more in the full article here.

20 Comments

    1. Do you really know anything at all about Linux? or you’re just trolling?

      I’m a Mac user since 2005. Before that, a Linux user (Slackware/RedHat/Ubuntu), since 1998. Before that, sure, DOS/Windows.

      And I still think Linux is awesome, way better than Windows. For people who can’t afford a Mac, Linux is a great alternative.

      Now Linux is ONLY the kernel. Every company builds their own layers over the kernel. Ubuntu is great. RedHat… I don’t like it that much anymore. Android is horrendous.

      But I believe it’s unfair to call all Linux users “freetards”. I still use it for servers. it’s outstanding. If you have some skills, you can tweak it, shape it, build upon it and create cool stuff.

      You can also create awful stuff, but it gives you the chance to do it.

      Among those experiments, the Wine project and now the Darling project are trying to do something at the least interesting. How do you think you are to insult them? Or insult all of the Linux community? And for what? For starting an experiment?

      No wonder some people treat us Mac users as arrogant idiots: Because of comments like this one.

      it’s OK to provide an objective analysis and criticism to a project, product, or OS. I do that myself! I bash Windows because of its quality all the time. I bash Android because my experience with it was horrendous. I praise Mac and iOS because it worked great for me. And I praise Linux because it opened many possibilite and allowed to learn a lot beyond the Microsoft world. BTW, not long ago, I posted a praise to the Nokia Windows Phone. I got one to replace my crappy Android phone (my carrier doesn’t carry iPhones), and while it’s not iOS, it’s by far superior than Android. And at least they’re paying Apple for the patents they use.

      But I don’t bash the users. One thing is to bash the products and the companies building them. Another thing is to insult people because they don’t use a Mac, or because they use X, Y or Z operating system.

      It’s plain wrong, unfair, and innacurate. And rude.

      1. We suffer through release after release of Apple OS and application updates that remove, dumb-down and change things to be slower, less useful and less stable. It becomes increasingly clear that if the computer matters to you as something other than a toy, Apple is not a reliable vendor. Apple makes it clear why Linux is something to seriously consider. Being able to run OSX apps on linux would therefore be very useful.

        More useful would be for a big name vendor – like intel – to step up and really make a run at selling linux to the masses. What would be needed would be serious effort to bullet-proof linux for users who do not want to go to the command line.

        Intel seems to be at the mercy of software vendors who are no longer aligned with Intels interests. Wouldn’t be nice for them to see a market develop that was not controlled by someone elses platform dreams/nightmares.

        Probably never happen, but if it did, I’d move off Mac OS in a heartbeat

  1. Well, crossover for Mac an Linux makes sense since you want to run all those applications not available natively but you don’t want the crappy OS windows. But who will want to run an Mac OS apps with out Mac OS? May be somebody. But it is good to know there is people researching all possibilities. Thanks to those creative minds.

    1. Mac OS X finder is buggy. HFS is buggy. Many basic networking services are buggy, especially in the server software. Apple’s Cloud services are buggy. If you could let me run my great Mac Apps but on a more solid foundation, I would like that.

      Sadly, after using products like Crossover, WINE, and BlueStacks, I am not convinced this project will ever be worth a look.

  2. Yes, because as we all know (insert sarcastic expression here), Linux will take over the world as the leading operating system. Any day now. Well, I’m pretty sure. I think.

    And don’t forget, Esperanto will become the most used language in the world, because adherents of the language told me so. And as we all know, they are never wrong.

    Stuff like this makes my head hurt.

    1. Linux as far as the kernel goes is pretty much there already. Its everywhere from super computers to real time industrial systems.

      Linux distributions on the desktop will never gain a lot of traction unless MS and Apple really hose up future releases of windows and OS X. MS is sure trying to kill the company with offerings like Windows 8.

    2. People here are use Linux computers everyday they use the Internet. Not sure how so many people either don’t understand that or don’t think that makes Linux important.

      Even Apple runs all their servers on Linux.

      I love Apple – but can’t stand how aggressively stupid many its supports can be. Can you idiots even wrap your head around Apple using millions of Linux computers as a crucial part of its business? “Apple Good, Linux Bad, Apple using Linux …. don’t understand.” Get a clue.

  3. I’m not sure what the big deal about this project is. I guess there might be a few rare cases where you’d want to run an older OS X app on a non-mac system but really its going to be easier to just have a mac around with whatever version of OS X you need installed on it with the needed applications.

  4. I don’t know if someone else shares my point of view, but I believe the Darling project can actually bring semi-peace with the BSD and Linux community. Because not only OS X applications they are trying to support, but even Apple’s open source OS called Darwin. Darwin also runs BSD binaries. So if this project can succeed, BSD binaries can also run on Linux. We have a Kernel and a OS, they both run each others binaries and they both run each others applications because of those binaries. Hell even the FreeBSD team said “BSD systems, in particular FreeBSD, can have notably higher performance than Linux. But this is not across the board. In many cases, there is little or no difference in performance. In some cases, Linux may perform better than FreeBSD.” So yeah, that’s my point of view. I don’t know about the Mac community, but the BSD community I believe.

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