Study: Apple converting more U.S. Android users to iPhone

According to a new survey from Consumer Intelligence Research Partners, more U.S. iPhone customers came from the ranks of Android users during this year’s iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c launch than they did during last year’s iPhone 5 launch.

“Ideally, Apple attracts a significant percent of its customers from Android and other systems,” CIRP partner and co-founder Mike Levin said in a statement. “At the most recent launch, though, Apple saw an increase in the share of customers that already had an iPhone. Perhaps because of the declining base of non-smartphone owners, a smaller percentage of iPhone buyers upgraded from a basic or flip phone, compared to the year-ago launch.”

According to CIRP’s survey graph, in September 2012, roughly 16% of iPhone buyers upgraded from Android phones. This September, with Apple’s launch of the 64-bit iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c, approximately 21% of iPhone buyers upgraded from Android phones.

CIRP: iPhone buyers, Sept. 2012 vs. Sept. 2013

Source: CIRP

MacDailyNews Take: The awakening is accelerating!

Update: 8:00pm EST: Rewrote third paragraph for clarity as per comments below.

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Yankee Group: Apple iPhone owners shop more, buy more, remain more loyal vs. other device users – July 20, 2010
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48 Comments

        1. Do you know that the people of the ‘south’ are from many races? If you think the culture of the south is homogenous and that makes up a ‘race’ of people then you are not familiar with the south and are clueless about science and the definition of race.

            1. Except for Alaska, anyway 🙂

              But still, it’s said that whenever a Canadian immigrates to the US, they increase the average IQ of both countries 😉

        1. Because I like the City more. Most of these neighborhoods are bad, but the best parts make up for that. I would rather hang out with a black teen from Chicago than a redneck hick from Bumhole, Nevrahoma. At least you have easy access to culture. Does hick farm towns have things like universities, museums, restaurants (and no McDonalds does not count) and shopping (Wal-Fart does not count either) If your town does not have an Apple Store, then it is a town full of Android sufferers.

          1. You are scary.
            Where do you think produce and steaks come from at the store? Some magic wizard in back says poof, and your filet mingnon shows up wrapped in saran wrap?

            You need a cross country drive and get educated.

            1. Have you heard of “urban farming”? It’s when unused lots, and unused warehouses are converted into areas of agriculture. It’s the future, and it will make traditional farms obsolete. Like Steve Jobs said, innovate or die. The cities are innovating, and the suburbs/small towns are dieing. That’s a fact!

            2. Re: Rick, Bobby, Luke, Bo, Daisey, Cooter, and Grandpa

              I’ve done a lot of traveling in the South for work, and having been born and raised in California, I was unprepared for the incredibly fascist behavior in many parts of the South. It’s no wonder they have such a problem with the President

              Let me tell yon of just one unbelievably racist incident:
              I went sight seeing at the Destrehan Plantation while in Louislanna. During this weekend they had booths circling the house with crafts, Collectibles (of the l’il Black Sambo and Mamie & Pappie variety), foodstuff, and local business groups.

              During my initial pass around the house, one of the very first booths I noticed was an artist that had taken plain china doll heads ( both black and white) and built eleborate handcrafted bodies with custom antebellum clothing.

              After completing my pass around the house, I saw a croud had gathered around the booth with the china dolls. I heared laughing and people saying ‘take a picture with me next!’

              As I squeezed into the crowd, I realized there was a lone woman in the center. When I finally reached the center of the crowd, I realized she was pretending to breast feed one of the china dolls.

              I was confused as to why this was funny or at least unusual enough to warrant a crowd of people laughing and taking pictures.

              I studied the woman once more and then realized she was pretending to nurse one of the black china dolls!

              I then turned so I could look into the faces of the people ithe crowd, still hooting, hollering, making racial slurs, and taking pictures, so as to never forget that disgusting display.

              So yes, there are incredibly racist people in the south.

            3. What? “It’s no wonder they have such a problem with the President.”
              I am from the North and I have a problem with the President. I don’t care if he’s black, purple, or orange. I don’t like how he operates and I was stupid enough to vote for him the first time around. Didn’t get suckered in to the B.S. the second time. I could name 3 black men I’d happily vote for that would kick his ass as Presidents.

            4. > Where do you think produce and steaks come from at the store?

              Well, now, let’s see. They come from farmers who get huge subsidies, that mostly come from the heavily populated areas of the country, where, you know, people actually do things that are highly profitable. Not that I have a problem with that… I like subsidizing farmers. It gets me cheap and reasonably high-quality food. But don’t pretend that somehow just because you make the food, that makes you better than those of us who design the iPhones, the software, your farm tools, your car, your television set, and more or less everything else EXCEPT the food.

              You might be able to live with out us… if you call subsistence farming ‘living’.

            5. I live among the so-called “Hee Haw Demographic”. Trust me when I tell you that we would survive far, FAR longer without you than you would without us. I know people in the trucking industry. Most cities have about a three day supply of food. When that gets cut off, three days later you are going hungry. Much less in reality since city people panic so easily and the store shelves would be bare in three hours at the first report of food shortages.

              All the “culture” and shopping malls become absolutely meaningless when you have nothing on your plate and an empty stomach.

              What this all boils down to is we all need each other. We need what is produced in the cities and you need what we produce out here in the sticks. Pitting each of us against one another will get us nowhere.

          2. Yeah, CITIES, CITIES, CITIES! Like, for instance, Chicago! The indisputable heart and soul of urban decadence, violence, murder, welfare, and the Great Mob Way! Long may it thrive on the backs of the law-abiding, work-ethic-oriented HeeHaw public! Gawd bless ya, Stinking Onion!

            1. As someone who grew up in Chicago’s South Side in the 1980s, I can say with honesty that it was tough, and harsh. But it made me who I am. I learned from my experiences as I grew up. I made a few mistakes here and there, but I still managed. Maybe I’m ol’-school, but it seems like today’s generation does not understand what us older folk had to go through in life.

          3. I live in the metro Chicago area. Culture? OK, though other major cities offer more. Hang out with a kid from the Ghetto? Ask the dead tourist from Oklahoma last week how that worked out. Having grown up in a “Hee Haw” town, lived in northeastern Illinois and traveled to several other major cities such as L.A., New York, Paris, Barcelona, St. Petersburg, Cophenhagen and several more, I can say that Chicago is a lot closer to Cairo. There’s a lot of history and culture but overall, the place is an unsafe dump.

  1. “According to CIRP’s survey graph, in September 2012, roughly 16% of Android users upgraded to Apple iPhone. This September, with Apple launch of the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c, approximately 21% of Android users upgraded to Apple iPhone.”

    ??? Unless the statement relates to some other graph not shown, I think you mean to say 16% of iPhone purchasers in 9/2012 were prior Android users and that ‘iPhone purchaser share’ for 9/2013 increased to 21%. Bad editting/spinning.. If it WERE true that 16%/21% of Android users switched over to iPhone sales would be MUCH better.. 😛

    1. @Xennex1770

      Agreed. They butchered that sentence. It should read that 16% of iPhone purchasers were former Android users. A very different statement than 16% of Android users switched to iPhone. I am an iPhone user, but facts are facts.

  2. It’s hopeful for Apple but it’s going to be a very slow process of converting Android users as long as Samsung is around. When a company keeps flooding the market it’s just hard for retailers not to push those particular products or they’ll get stuck with massive amounts of inventory.

    Samsung seems quite prepared to take huge financial losses in order to ruin Apple’s mobile hardware business. Apple would really have to focus on holding on to the high-end smartphone and tablet business for a few years in order to make Samsung give up. Samsung would eventually end up in the same situation Nokia did when it’s high-end product gains couldn’t offset the low-end product losses. The more third-world countries Samsung tries hold market share in will cause greater losses for the company if their high-end products don’t sell in high enough quantities.

    It’s still going to be a drag on Apple’s market share gains which is going to continue to be detrimental to Apple shareholders. Apple absolutely needs to seek outside revenue other than what they’re getting from mobile hardware sales. Every new category of mobile hardware Apple creates will immediately be attacked by Android copycats.

  3. Blackberry is dropping like a rock …. Next year will be even worse for them ….

    Should Apple release a couple different sizes and models, they will rule he market, if they can manufacture fast enough …. They need more output, waiting 3 weeks for a phone turns some people off ….

  4. I ask people I know what their next phone will be and why. One said they will replace their Android phone with a new one because, “it has more features than the iPhone”. I say, “Good for you!” I love my iPhone 5s.

    1. Yup. It’s “new,” so it must be better, right? Fact is, any good smartphone is going to continue to be a good performer for at least a couple years. But people are entranced by shiny shit and gimmick words and the sense of status of having something that’s “new,” even though it’s basically the same thing as last season’s phones. Finances be damned — without all the latest crap, fanboys lose their appearance of “having it all.”
      I just see these Verizon commercials with parents and their children of all ages carrying the latest and greatest cell phones. And they just HAVE TO HAVE this year’s model because… because… because… there’s 15 more megapixels on this year’s camera!!!

      Who the fuck cares? Why not invest that money so you’re not living paycheck to paycheck?!?

      1. Wow, a voice of reason! I would not be surprised if you were from the older generation.

        I never could and still can’t understand the gotta have it now and in six months gotta have that one now though process. Then these same people can’t pay their bills. Just his week my 7 year old flip phone bit the dust. I guess I’ll get an iPhone now. But it’ll be a 4s, prices are great for those.

        1. Thank you for your kind words. I was hoping someone would say this instead of calling names like “Samsung/Gaagle/Fragmandroid shill” but it’s true, know what I’m sayin’? I am an Apple fan, but also an old soul. I still have my ’84 Mac that I got on my 16th birthday. I still have some great computer games for that joint. Good times. I guess the spirit of the ’80s is long gone except for a select few.

          1. It is still there to a much larger degree than you might think. We just are not generally as vocal as some of the other groups. But that’s OK because it is difficult to change people’s opinions these days. Many people cling very tightly their preferred and flawed simplification of the world.

      2. They are children, and behave as such…or so the forces of advertising believe, and they appear not too far off the mark as far as consumer choice is concerned.

        Excess, and a sense of privilege and entitlement, seem to accompany each new generation’s emergence into the cultural and commercial scenes. And each generation turns up their noses at the values of the previous one, ignores the lessons of its mistakes and dares to repeat them, sure of a different outcome. World without end, it would seem.

        1. The problem, at least to me, seems like that today’s commercials are too “in your face” about advertising. I think commercials should be more humble about their mission. That is why I loved Apple’s commercials in the 80s, 90s, and to a certain extent, today. My favorite commercial was the “Think Different” set which showed icons of the 20th Century, with those simple 2 words. If more media were like that today, then maybe people would not be so stressed out today. We live in a rush, and don’t really appreciate the simple pleasures in life.

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