Bloomberg reviews Apple’s iOS 7: A potent update

“Shiny new iPhones always get the most attention. But it’s iOS 7, the updated version of Apple’s mobile-device operating system, that will have the biggest impact on users,” Rich Jaroslovsky writes for Bloomberg. “The new operating system, now being installed on hundreds of millions of iPhones, iPads and iPods, introduces a host of useful new features and functions. To appreciate it, you’ll first have to get used to its revamped look and feel, by far the most significant makeover since the 2007 launch.”

“Apple users who don’t like change may initially have a tough time with iOS 7 and its core apps. Gone are most of the familiar muted-palette design elements and those meant to mimic real-world objects — the wooden shelves of the Newsstand app, for instance, and the image of the desk calendar,” Jaroslovsky writes. “In their place are flat, brightly colored icons that, depending on your taste, are either hip and modern-looking or cartoon-like. I’ve used the new software on the iPhone 5s and 5c, as well on an iPhone 5 and a third-generation iPad. To me, they seem most at home on the new iPhone 5c, with its colored plastic body. On the iPhone 5 and 5s, with their more elegant lines and materials, iOS 7 feels a little like cotton candy at a dinner party.”

Apple's iOS 7
Apple’s iOS 7

 
“But it’s potent cotton candy. Behind the new look are a host of changes, mostly for the better, in how iDevices actually work,” Jaroslovsky writes. “iOS 7 represents a significant advance. My guess is users will keep discovering things for weeks if not months. Hey, you can easily block callers! Hey, Siri is no longer labeled ‘beta’ and works noticeably better! Hey, Senator John McCain: Apps can now update automatically! While the new look takes some getting used to, the new features are well worth it.”

Full review here.

MacDailyNews Take: Of course, iOS 7 can look markedly different depending on your choice of wallpapers, use of folders, etc.

Apple's basic iOS 7 example on the left vs. a MacDailyNews iPhone 5 running iOS 7 on the right.
Apple’s basic iOS 7 example on the left vs. a MacDailyNews iPhone running iOS 7 on the right.

Related articles:
Smartphone OS user experience shootout: Apple’s iOS 7 dominates Android, Windows Phone, BlackBerry – September 24, 2013
FaceTime Audio is Apple’s biggest little feature addition in iOS 7 – September 23, 2013
The secret of iOS 7 – September 20, 2013
Apple targets the enterprise with powerful iOS 7 – September 19, 2013

24 Comments

  1. If by “potent”, you mean the poisonous drivel spread by trolls on this website (you know who you are) by people ignorant about the positives of iOS 7, then yes, it’s a potent update. Just change one thing, and people go crazy. I would not be surprised if this same FUD was spread by former “Apple Fans” when OS X replaced OS 9 back in 2001.

      1. Why should I take a racist with a dirty nickname seriously? You keep pounding you ideas into other people’s heads to the point that it is getting redundant, and boring. No one cares.

    1. I would not be surprised if this same FUD was spread by former “Apple Fans” when OS X replaced OS 9 back in 2001.

      Oh, believe me, it was. There was an entire forum on the old “MacFixIt” site that had to be shut down after it became a clubhouse for whiny Mac OS 9 fans mourning “the death of the Mac”, despite ostensibly being a forum for chatting about OS X.

      And “mourning” is the correct word. The forum was full of long, depressing screeds about how OS X represented the death of the Mac platform and maybe of Apple altogether. My favorite was the prediction that OS X would drive countless Mac users to Windows 98, because the two platforms were now “the same” (apparently because OS X had too many colors).

      MacFixIt shut the forum down after about a year when it was becoming an embarrassment to the site.

      ——RM

    2. I was there yes it was exactly the same when OS X came along though back then I just could not see how anyone could prefer the older software. This is a far more subtle change which has pluses and minuses though underneath nearly all the former.

  2. We should have to alter fonts, backgrounds, etc. to make iOS7 palatable! It’s default look sucks unless u like feminine designs. I don’t! Tweeking has made it bearable, barely.

      1. Christo, you might want to look up the definition of “potent”. While indeed iOS7 ushers in under-the-skin changes to work with Apple’s groundbreaking iPhone 5S hardware, the majority of the work hours were spent “harmonizing” the GUI, with mixed results. The majority of Ive’s change for the sake of change does NOTHING to improve speed or capability of the interface. Parallax, animations, re-interpreted icons, and other eye candy fluff have not improved the OS in any way that any sane human would claim, “that iOS7 sure is more potent!”

        … and no, I am not claiming that iOS7 is less potent either. It’s just not attractive to a significant percentage of adults who have maturing eyes and no love of borderless cotton candy and flat icons with no texture. Skeu is NOT a bad thing when implemented properly.

        1. “Significant percentage” meaning you and a few other complainers on the forum.

          Personally, I love the animations, especially for the folders. Zooming into a folder makes so much more sense to me than a drawer sliding open underneath it.

          And BTW, the animations are silky smooth on my 4S, despite the advice you gave someone on this forum that a 4 or 4S might not have the horsepower to handle the system.

          ——RM

          1. Well, my nonscientific poll shows that most adult males do not like the new look at all. A recent MacRumors round-up (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?p=17984210) indicated that:
            30% of iOS7 users aren’t happy with it overall,
            50% of users have disabled the parallax effect, and
            65% dislike the new icons.

            Who knows how scientifically valid that is, but clearly there are disgruntled people.

            Please conduct your own statistically valid poll and let us know what you find.

        2. I tend to agree. Skeu is a confusing term really after all we have gone from a safari icon that was pure beautiful amorphous impressionist image in now ay mimicking a real object to a flat ugly, boring one that imitates a cheap compass. Which is more mimicking? Looking above where you see the ‘Find iPhone’ icon it is a more literal version of the old safari treatment yet isnt changed. Worse still next to the new safari icon it simply shows the latter up for its naffness. It also actually works well on its bg the depth on flat bg contrast actually works and shows how safari and so many others could have been done with far greater effect than flat on flat but with inconsistencies to give variation one suspects. As for the newstand icon that is a confusing mix of real and symbolic that is neither consistent nor attractive.

  3. I like the new direction if iOS but some parts seem either a step backwards or unfinished and hopefully the will be refined.

    My major issues are using text for tappable areas when there are actual button icons in the same interface. It’s confusing and I find it a step backwards at times. Skumorphism isn’t bad if done minimally like the icons that are in place as it is. Also, I feel there us an awful lot of white pace in the interface. I find it headache inducing in low light situations. Also I’m not a fan of the use of cyan and magenta for tappable text and buttons. I wish it was either customizable or red and blue.

    Otherwise from the above I’m totally digging everything else.

  4. My biggest gripe is the fluorescent color green used for iMessage text messages. Fine white text of brilliant green backgrounds??? A legibility nightmare. That is a preference that needs to be made user selectable.

  5. My major quibble about the iOS 7 interface is that there are too many frequently-used screens that have a flat white background which cannot be altered (e.g., the phone keypad screen). If you’ve ever been in a darkened area and had that screen blast your eyes out, you know what I mean.

    iOS 7 is, all things considered, very good. It still needs some tweaks before it becomes great.

  6. I think the new look is shown off best with the right wallpaper. Something to busy just doesn’t work and makes a lot of icons look to flat and simple.

    Personally I’ve always grouped my screens by basic types of apps and then where possible tried to organise things by colour, which I think looks better. I accept that might be a bit odd.

  7. iOS 7 is cool. But what the bleep were they thinking with:
    the camera icon – could it be any more dull?
    safari – sorry but it hurts the eyes and is that red or the most uncomfortable colour ever?
    But the rest of the icons are B E A U tiful !

    1. I must admit the weather icon is really nice, the video simple clean but attractive but yes where does that camera icon fit in and I have raged enough about the safari debacle. Ive barked on about consistency yet the trouble is its full of inconsistencies which makes the acceptance of some of the poor icons even more difficult to accept. I was actually looking forward to the animations as compensation but sadly don’t get those on my iPad nor the parallax for good or bad. Sadly tasteful simple unassuming beauty of the lock screen goes into a mishmash that undersells the improvements the update offers underneath. A work in progress is my best assessment.

  8. IPAD 4 32 GB wifi gsm for sale ; 1 month old with ugliest IOS interface ever. IOS 7 S***S
    How the F*** created this?
    Gonne sell al my apple stock product … instable .. work in progress its not even called beta worthy ..

  9. Here is a novel idea, want to innovate? Empower the user to choose interfaces, maybe sell us a tool kit to make our own interfaces, and then study what type of interfaces we create? See wha the market really desires, by enableing and empowering it to create the future it wants, not what you want.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.