Apple hires Adobe technology chief Kevin Lynch as vice president

“Apple Inc. hired Adobe Systems Inc. Chief Technology Officer Kevin Lynch, adding a software executive who helped build some of the earliest Macintosh applications and later sparred publicly with the iPhone maker,” Adam Satariano reports for Bloomberg.

“Lynch, who has worked at Adobe since 2005, will become Apple’s vice president for technology, reporting to Senior Vice President Bob Mansfield, the Cupertino, California-based company said yesterday,” Satariano reports. “During Lynch’s tenure, Apple and the software maker clashed over the use of Adobe’s Flash video program on Apple’s devices. Apple co-founder Steve Jobs said Flash was ill-suited for mobile computing and banned its use on the iPhone or iPad. Lynch said the move would cost Apple customers. The conflict has since abated as Adobe and other technology companies embrace the emerging Web standard HTML5 as an alternative for running video on handheld devices.”

MacDailyNews Take: Exactly as Steve said it would.

Satariano reports, “Lynch may help Apple build out more so-called cloud services that let customers access stored content from different devices, an area where Google Inc. has made strides, said Jeffrey Hammond, an analyst at Forrester Research Inc.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Hey, Kev, how’s the 19th-century railroad treatin’ ya?

New hire Kevin Lynch once compared Apple to a 19th-century railroad
New hire Kevin Lynch once compared Apple to a 19th-century railroad

Related articles:
Adobe CTO tries defending the indefensible Flash pig – November 9, 2010
Adobe CTO likens Apple to 19th-century railroad – May 5, 2010

40 Comments

  1. He’s a complete buffoon, this hire rings up there with the retail clown that was able to almost singlehanded lay unravel their retail operations they spent ten years building in six months. What the hell is going on over at Apple that is having them choose so poorly for their leadership and why can’t they find more internal people to train up and promote?

  2. Well, they must have something in mind in Cupertino. I’ll give them the benefit of the doubt in particular after the fiasco with Browett. They generally don’t do stupid things. They’re well aware that this is a high profile move on their part.

    1. They learned from the Google mole that if they hire some ignoramus from another company, that it will improve the other company’s products.
      So, hire ignoramus, let him send improvement ideas to other company and Adobe software improves for the mac. Expensive and risky, but sneaky.
      Nah. I got nothing here. Head scratcher.

    2. I agree.

      On the face of it, this is a slightly puzzling hire because of Lynch’s fights over Flash for IOS, but Tim Cook must think very highly of Lynch in order to offer him such a vital job. The good news is that if this turns out to be a mistake, Cook has been seen to get rid of people pretty quickly.

      It’s not often that is disagree with Gruber, but I don’t see a problem with Lynch fighting the corner for Flash while he worked at Adobe. It was his job to do that and he did it to the best of his abilities, but was of course let down by the product itself and the team behind it. If he puts up an equally vigorous fight on behalf of Apple’s products, then that can only be a good thing. Lynch appears to have a decent track record regarding developing Cloud services, so that should be good news for Apple.

        1. We’ve given Cook plenty of time to show decisive leadership. Then when Cook finally does make his decisions, this level of ineptitude is what occurs. Same in retail. Same in Mac software.

          Why are so many people willing to give Cook so much rope?

    3. I gave Apple a year of “giving them the benefit of the doubt”. Well, I no longer have doubts; they suck, and they have gone to great effort to consistently prove it in everything they have touched in the past 12 months.
      Have you ever seen a map of the Sierra Mountains? Moist winds from the ocean, creating the fertile plains of California, rising up the side of the mountains creating thriving forests. But, when it reaches the top, it has exhausted all of it moisture and on the back side lies nothing but desert. Now, take a look at Apple’s 2-year stock trend. As you can see, they currently are entering Death Valley. If they make it through the waterless desolation alive, then they’re left with the remaining choice of which one of the old desert retirement villages to wait out their final days.

      1. Stock trend is absolutely not the way to measure Apples success. Also notice that you say everything they have done in 12 months sucks, well I’m typing this on my mini iPad which I run a profitable business on, and use it to take notes in class. I assure you that it does not suck.

      2. I enjoy your analogy. I wouldn’t give up on Apple just yet. They have done some very poor strategizing in my humble opinion. I believe not having the affordable iPhone for the emerging markets and a larger iPhone for the rest of the market is a real failure. Browett was a terrible mistake. Maps fiasco. iMac screwup. But I think they can turn the ship around and headed it in the right direction again. It seems as though they are finally fighting back. In the past they could be aloof and get by with it. Why lower yourself to the level of your detractors if you don’t have to? Well, if you don’t have to, don’t. Now they do. They’re in for a bit of a street fight now so they had better take the gloves off and put the brass knuckles on. No more Mr. nice guy. Steve Jobs wasn’t a nice guy. He had no problem hitting below the belt. Tim and Company need to do the same. I like a good fight. It’s healthy.

    4. I have some serious doubts, particularly after the fiasco with Browett. They didn’t used to do so many stupid things, lately it seems a recurring theme.

  3. Since ADBE market cap this morning is $21B I guess that puts a limit on how much Apple is paying Lynch.

    There must be a whole more to this than meets the eye. Granted Adobe is a smaller company, but moving from CTO to VP is a little odd. Mansfield is a top-notch guy, so this is an intriguing development, positive for Apple, I think, and negative for Adobe probably.

  4. So the downward spiral may really be starting. Lynch is a bozo, he is not A-Grade talent. This doesn’t bode well.

    Adobe is a hot mess, especially flash.

    If you think Gruber was skewering this guy, check out Bynkii’s blog. Flash is a menace to support on OS X, and he is responsible for it.

    Apple doesn’t need a corner cutting, also-ran, they need greatness.

    1. I totally agree its very generous to say that flash runs on Macs as it is a disgrace on Macs. It functions on Macs the same way you can compete on a marathon with two broken arms and two broken legs.

      Flash only really runs well on Windows and it is a security vulnerability there. It really is a disgrace of a technology that needs to die as soon as possibly completely and forever.

      1. I support HTML 5 because it’s not proprietary like Flash.

        Outside of the security issues and constant updates apparently inherent with Flash, my Macs DO work splendidly with Flash, thank you. One thing Apple could do to further decimate Flash would be to get Quicktime Broadcaster on par with Adobe’s Flash Media Live Encoder. Apple hasn’t updated Quicktime Broadcaster in a very long time.

        1. Might want to rethink your position. Next time you access some flash based content, listen to the fans roar on your mac. Open the activity monitor and look at the cpu cycles and all the memory being paged. Maybe if you will get on of the Kernel Panics it can induce, if you are lucky it will only crash Safari.

          Then think about how once a week (seems that way lately anyway) you go to access that flash content and instead get a blocked plugin window. Now download and install and then 10 minutes later access the content you wanted.

          Now imagine you have to support hundreds (or more) macs that REQUIRE flash to access important content. Add the knowledge that there are no working mass deployment tools for Flash on os x. Add the knowledge that your users cannot be local admins.

          Tell me again how it works “Splendidly”. You are out of your mind, take off the rose colored consumer glasses.

          I do agree Apple needs to work on the ENTIRE quicktime suite. Software development, not tied to iOS seems to be seriously lagging these days at Apple.

          1. I’m not rethinking my damn position, lol! As if I haven’t looked looked at the activity monitor and seen how Adobe Flash is a processor hog. Humble yourself, sir. For my case scenario, my Macs work great with it (given even Flash’s deficiencies). You see, I don’t have “hundreds (or more) Macs”, you arrogant ASSHOLE!

            1. No need to get butt-hurt and start slinging names.

              So it works “Splendidly” OTHER than being a resource hog, requiring constant attention to update… So what you really mean is “My mac works great in spite of flash being installed.”

              Nothing I said was arrogant pal, I voiced an opinion formed from experience, shared another perspective, and was discussing the topic at hand.

              How dare I suggest someone rethink what they just said. You have contradicted yourself twice now, make up your mind, either Flash works splendidly or it works and has some issues.

              you sir, are the asshole.

            2. No sir, YOU are the asshole.. Flash works splendidly no thinking required. There are many applications that are resource hogs and also have constant updates. They still work splendidly for their particular purpose. There’s no contradiction in that.

              I’m not out of my mind, but you are still an arrogant asshole.

      2. It is broken for sure. It is a bloody freaking nightmare to support on hundreds to thousands of Macs.

        Packages that aren’t really packages, endless authentication and piss poor automation.

        Add in Safari blocking it as soon as a new version is released and it becomes a nightmare.

        Unfortunately we use products that require it, and no we cannot simply switch, not so easy. Great content, horrible delivery system is what we have now.

          1. It is content we pay to access, the content owner develops with Flash and Java. It has nothing to do with our in-house tech competency.

            I wish and hope that Apple will now be able to work with Adobe to fix it.

            Right now the fix is we are going to ask users to use Chrome to access said content. A whole new bag of hurt, but better than endless patch management on a plugin with no enterprise management features. They cannot even make a proper pkg install.

    1. So Apple is immune to criticism because Windows 8 and Dell suck? Apple can release shitty products as long as they are less shitty than Microsoft or Dell’s?

      Some logic there pal.

      Since when are they immune from criticism? When did they become flawless?

      Last I checked mistakes and correction are good for improvement and learning. Criticism has a role to play in that process.

      1. You, obviously, don’t use both OS X on a Mac and Windows 8 on a Dell. If you did you would know the frustration factor using Win 8 on a Dell is about 5 orders of magnitude higher than the OSX Mac.

        You are bitching about very petty irritants.

  5. Shocking. Wether this guy is a fuqtard or not, this is a terrible move. When’s the last time Adobe innovated anything? The 1980’s? Lightroom is better than Aperture but that’s about it. Ah… Maybe Cook is trying to beat down Apple’s stock price so he can personally buy the company.

    Cook and Lynch can do some major damage befor they’re both fired.

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