Tim Cook under pressure: What to expect at Wednesday’s Apple shareholder meeting

“Apple CEO Tim Cook will be under pressure to answer questions about what the tech giant plans to do with its $137 billion cash load while at the company’s annual shareholder meeting Wednesday,” Cadie Thompson reports for CNBC.

“At the meeting last year, Apple could point to the stock as a place for investors to find returns, but that strategy is unlikely to appease shareholders this year as pressure mounts about Apple’s fallen stock price and the company’s plans regarding what it has in store for its massive cash balance,” Thompson reports. “While Apple is now paying out a dividend and has a multiyear stock buyback plan in place, the iPhone maker is not doing enough for shareholders’ return on investment, according to Greenlight Capital president David Einhorn.”

Thompson reports, “Cook has said Apple would ‘thoroughly consider’ Einhorn’s proposal to return cash to shareholders, but has not revealed details about how the company plans to do so. The meeting gives the company the perfect opportunity to shed more light on its cash strategy.”

Read more in the full article here.

Related article:
Analysts: Apple may crack open its massive, bulging wallet for shareholders – February 8, 2013

20 Comments

  1. This is the problem with people. You start giving them things like dividend and stock buyback programs and they always want more.

    Hasn’t Einhorn bankrupted enough companies and barely escaped prosecution? Someone should tell him to just fuck off.

    1. I would settle for ANYONE at Apple going head to head with the old crap and slanted reporting that I hear every day now. With just a little knowledge anyone would be able to smell the BS before the analysts open their mouths.

      1. Just this morning, Bloomberg had a chart of iPhone 4S sales showing that they dropped off the last 2 quarters of 2012. Never showed or talked about the iPhone 5 that took it’s place. Really. No one at Apple able to take a little time and show this crap for what it is.

    2. Tim is certainly not Steve, but he already has referred to Einhorn’s tactics as ‘a silly sideshow’ to Goldman Sachs last week. I give him credit for that. I like to see him ruffle Wallstreet’s feathers a little more. Those morons deserve it.

  2. A serious financial system would have already banned someone like Einhorn from trading after his previous stunts and highly publicized shorts.

    All he cares about is how we’ll load himself with a company’s cash and then moves on to the next target.

  3. Wow, now it’s all clear, this is a conspiracy!

    Looks like this was organized, first cause a massive sell-off by dumping your stock and spreading rumors, then sue the company and ask for their pile of cash because the stock is not doing great

    “At the meeting last year, Apple could point to the stock as a place for investors to find returns, but that strategy is unlikely to appease shareholders this year as pressure mounts about Apple’s fallen stock price and the company’s plans regarding what it has in store for its massive cash balance,”

  4. He’s under pressure for a lot more than this. It all won’t come out in this week’s meeting but unless AAPL recovers he should not be around to face the music next year. Those in denial can continue to use profane and obscene words to attack me but I’m looking better with every passing day. Every day.

    1. You’ve been doggedly making the case against Tim Cook for a while now, and while Apple faithful dislike having their new leader castigated, they like even less his passivity in the face of leering, taunting, menacing creatures in the wild who seem to easily tip investor sentiment into the doldrums with a word, a glance, or a rumour, and abhor his aloofness with respect to the yellow journalists. Steve Jobs would have stared them down, or made them an irrefusable offer, or ripped them a new one.

      So we wait. Tomorrow, at the stockholders’ meeting, Tim Cook had better become Tim Burton, or Shane, otherwise some of us may nominate you as a replacement.

  5. Apple’s cash has really exploded just in the last couple of years. I have no problem with Apple being cautious about increasing dividends. I’m not much interested in a stock buy back program. They don’t seem effective.

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