“Verizon, the largest U.S. wireless carrier, implores the United States District Court for the Northern District of California to deny Apple’s request for a US-wide preliminary injunction against four Samsung products (the Infuse 4G, Galaxy S 4G and Droid Charge smartphones, and the Galaxy Tab 10.1 tablet computer), arguing that such a decision would run counter to the public interest as it ‘would hinder Verizon Wireless in developing and deploying its next generation high-speed LTE [fourth-generation] network, the job growth dependant on that network, and will undercut key public policy goals, including expansion of American’s [sic] access to broadband networks and faster communication with emergency personnel,'” Florian Mueller reports for FOSS Patents.

“This attempt by Verizon to interfere with Apple’s enforcement of intellectual property rights against Android in general and Samsung in particular is a declaration of war that may have far-reaching consequences in the U.S. market,” Mueller reports. “I’m sure that Apple will view this move as a self-serving attempt to game the system in Android’s and Samsung’s favor, as another sign of Verizon being staunchly Android-aligned in exchange for market-distorting favors from Google, and as an attack on the intellectual property-centric business model of Apple and other innovators.”

Mueller reports, “Verizon, which recently proposed that President Barack Obama should exercise his presidential veto right against possible ITC import bans against Apple’s as well as Android-based devices, filed a motion for leave (a request for permission) to file an amicus curiae brief in support of Samsung ahead of a court hearing scheduled for October 13, after which there might be a preliminary injunction against four relatively new Android-based Samsung products. An amicus curiae brief is a way for third parties with an interest in the outcome of a lawsuit to present their views to the court. The judge will now have to decide whether Verizon is admitted as an amicus curiae, which literally means ‘friend of the court.'”

Much more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Lowell, you got some ‘splainin’ to do!