RIM BlackBerry in freefall at Verizon as Apple iPhone looms

ZAGG Deal!“The BlackBerry’s influence at Verizon has nearly collapsed since Android reached the carrier, ITG Investment Research analyst Matthew Goodman said on Friday,” Electronista reports.

“RIM represented over 90 percent of Verizon’s smartphone sales as recently as October 2009 but crashed almost immediately after the Motorola Droid arrived at Verizon a month later,” Electronista reports. “It has since fallen over the past year from 55 percent to less than 20 percent as of November 2010. The 80 percent remaining is now almost exclusively attributed to Android, Goodman wrote.”

Electronista reports, “AllThingsD noted that the BlackBerry’s greatly reduced presence at Verizon corroborated rumors of a shift in attention to iPhone plans. With BlackBerry 6 upgrades and devices unlikely to produce a major effect, Verizon is more likely to be courting Apple to accelerate sluggish growth. It now depends primarily on Android, but the platform hasn’t been enough to overcome an AT&T that has nearly caught up in subscriber numbers due almost entirely to iPhone sales.”

Read more in the full article here.

26 Comments

  1. Verizon. Getting the iPhone any day now since 2007…

    It will be interesting to see 2011 come and go without a Verizon iPhone. After all, the 5-year AT&T agreement doesn’t expire until the end of next year…

    As for RIM, it would be nice to see them stay relevant, because the competition between wannabes is always more fun to watch if there are several participants (RIM, WinPhone7, Android, Web OS, Symbian…).

  2. I went into an AT&T store with my in-laws as they wanted to buy iPhone 4’s and the sales people were really pushing the Windows phone – It was really annoying – I did play with the Windows phone and what the hell were they thinking? Looks like fisher-price designed that OS – I can’t find anything on that piece of crap – God I love my iPhone..

  3. The sales people at AT&T were pushing Windows phone because iPhone sells by itself. No sales effort is needed to move iPhones, and they often times don’t have them in stock because of that. Meanwhile, when some other device is collecting dust in your warehouse, you work up your best pitch in order to move the damn thing…

  4. iPhone has real competition in android and anyone who doesn’t recognize this needs to wake up and snort an expresso. Hopefully apple will have enough new OS toys up their sleeve to keep the kids interested and to prove they are the best. This game won’t play out like Mac but it also won’t play out like iPod either.

  5. Wha “Still can’t wait for All Things D to air the complete video of the interview with Mike Lazaridis”

    I can stand to watch it. Already know enough not to pick up a BB again.

  6. Why do you insist on hanging onto the 5 year exclusivity agreement? Do you not understand that business deals can (and usually do) change? It’s very likely the deal was altered so Apple could get out early, much like they did with carriers around the world. Verizon will get the iPhone in the first half of 2011. And you will look foolish for being so close-minded.

  7. @Yoyo

    No doubt that Google’s Android OS is the iPhone’s major competitor. It is very popular in my neck of the woods as AT&T’s rural coverage is horrendous. However, Android has a very tumultuous road ahead of it. There is still the lawsuit from Oracle, ya know the one that contends the Android OS is just one big rip-off of Java? Not to mention that Android is as fragmented as most Windows hard drives. But, the fact that bothers me the most when comparing Android activations to iPhone activations, that hardly anybody in the media even gives lip service to.

    Android is available to multiple carriers (i.e, all of them) with dozens of different phones while the iPhone is available on 1 carrier with 2 models.

    When, not if, the iPhone moves to multiple carriers (and not just Verizon but at least 3 carriers) will be the true test whether Android has staying power. Your average consumer does not need Android’s openness, the freedom to download anything you want may be nice but a lot of consumers do not need it and they realize it. I would much rather use Apple’s curated app store and be pretty certain that what I’m downloading won’t completely ruin my device. If I was a power user with my smartphone I would care about being able to log into root and really use the device, however when I’m not at my desk using my power machines I could give a rat’s ass about being able to do that kind of thing. And most consumers don’t care about doing that kind of thing at all.

    Personally, Android will be around and popular in the short term. As technology advances and user privacy and device security become even more critical the “openness” of Android will not necessarily be a good thing. Because, while Android is certainly open in that you can download pretty much whatever you want it is not open in the sense that it is open source. Google routinely closes outside development of Android to work with smartphone manufacturers and each carrier adds their own proprietary touch. This does not make a good user experience.

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