Goldman Sachs doesn’t see new iPad models until June 2011

“Analysts at Goldman Sachs Group said Monday Apple Inc. may roll out a thinner iPad with a built-in camera and mini-USB drive by June, later than some others have projected,” Cromwell Schubarth reports for The Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal.

“Sales of tablet computers from Apple and others could reach 16 million units this year and 35 million in 2011, Goldman Sachs projected,” Schubarth reports.

MacDailyNews Take: Yeah, right, “and others.” Puleeze. 15,999,996 iPads and four non-Apple tablets to the Ballmer household.

Schubarth reports, “Apple sold more than 3 million iPads in the 80 days after they were introduced in April, instantly becoming one of its best-selling products.”

Full article here.

62 Comments

  1. Guess that means Goldman is short on Apple. Or maybe not? You never know what side Goldman is actually playing. The sad thing is that people like me waste time reading their prognostications, hoping that perhaps once there will be some grounding for it other than pure speculation.

  2. Guess that means Goldman is short on Apple. Or maybe not? You never know what side Goldman is actually playing. The sad thing is that people like me waste time reading their prognostications, hoping that perhaps once there will be some grounding for it other than pure speculation.

  3. No big-name analyst can allow themselves to be exuberant about Apple (or any other company for that matter), because, regardless of merit, nobody would take them seriously. They must tone down any optimism, since the entire planet is in a financial crisis, so by default, it is simply impossible that any one company could be doing that well.

    This also applies to reporters covering these analysts, such as this Shubarth fellow from San Jose Business News. Not one single sentence is completely correct, but just vaguely close to being correct:

    “Apple sold more than 3 million iPads in the 80 days after they were introduced in April, instantly becoming one of its best-selling products.”

    It is not one of its best-selling products; it is THE best selling product of all time. Not Apple, and not anyone else, has ever sold a product in such numbers so quickly.

    It is really annoying when, in a rush to meet a deadline, everyone just goes into the CYA mode (cover-your-ass), rather than do a bit of googling and actually verify the numbers, so that they can say it correctly.

    There are very, very few publications today that still have fact checkers on staff.

  4. No big-name analyst can allow themselves to be exuberant about Apple (or any other company for that matter), because, regardless of merit, nobody would take them seriously. They must tone down any optimism, since the entire planet is in a financial crisis, so by default, it is simply impossible that any one company could be doing that well.

    This also applies to reporters covering these analysts, such as this Shubarth fellow from San Jose Business News. Not one single sentence is completely correct, but just vaguely close to being correct:

    “Apple sold more than 3 million iPads in the 80 days after they were introduced in April, instantly becoming one of its best-selling products.”

    It is not one of its best-selling products; it is THE best selling product of all time. Not Apple, and not anyone else, has ever sold a product in such numbers so quickly.

    It is really annoying when, in a rush to meet a deadline, everyone just goes into the CYA mode (cover-your-ass), rather than do a bit of googling and actually verify the numbers, so that they can say it correctly.

    There are very, very few publications today that still have fact checkers on staff.

  5. It’s time to get the “big-name analysts” out of our lives and let them worry about being unemployed. They are now threadbare window-dressing for highly sophisticated Hedge Fund computerized Trading systems and devious investment bank Vice Presidents.

  6. It’s time to get the “big-name analysts” out of our lives and let them worry about being unemployed. They are now threadbare window-dressing for highly sophisticated Hedge Fund computerized Trading systems and devious investment bank Vice Presidents.

  7. All the current mobile Apple products (iPods, iPhone) have settled into a one-year refresh cycle. In the history of Apple’s products, there were very few instances when an existing product was refreshed before a full year was up (iPod Mini comes to mind as such an exception).

    So far, iPad has been a record-breaking runaway success, and continues to be a problem for Apple’s supply chain. They have absolutely no reason to force an update to it sooner than June. If they did, early adopters would feel somewhat foolish for jumping onto the first version, when for the same money, second, better one came out just a few months later.

    The only possible reason for an early refresh would be if competition suddenly picked up and began making meaningful inroads. It would have to me much more meaningful than Android is in the smartphone space, though, since it is obvious that Android has had no impact on the iPhone refresh cycle, and is likely NOT to have any impact on that cycle in the future.

    We’ll have to wait and see, but I’d be surprised if Apple came out with an iPad 2.0 before end of May.

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