CNBC’s Goldman: Having an Apple iPhone tie boosts companies; like the ‘New Dot Com,” but for real

Apple Online Store “Remember the frothy days of the dot com bubble? It was like watching one of those films in science class where time-lapse photography captured a flower blooming, bursting into beautiful colors, dancing in the breeze,” Jim Goldman writes for CNBC. “New companies would seem to burst forth on a daily basis, but more interestingly, established companies that merely announced some kind of web strategy, even if it were simply adding a home page, watched their stocks soar.”

“Today, we have a new kind of craze, courtesy of Apple, its iPhone, and that incredible engine-that-could, the App Store. Look no further than Radio Shack this morning,” Goldman writes. “The company announces that it will become an authorized reseller of Apple’s iPhone and the stock jumps 10 percent on the news.”

“It seems that Apple’s App Store is the train everyone is trying to catch. Merely by announcing they have an ‘app strategy’ is enough to pop a stock,” Goldman writes. “We heard from eBay last week that transactions on the iPhone through PayPal hit a half-billion dollars in the blink of an eye. Electronic Arts, which reports earnings tonight, has seen something like $1 billion in revenue from its games available on the App Store.”

Goldman writes, “Apple itself has said that there are now over 100,000 apps available for download, and they’ve been downloaded over 2 billion times. Some cost money, others are free, and we still don’t have a clear picture of just how much of a money-maker the service is. But unlike the dot com craze, with its nutty eye-ball valuations, this is real money, real innovation, real growth.”

There’s much more in the full article – recommended – here.

15 Comments

  1. Wake me up when MAC’s strategy of copying Windows Mobile’s phenomenal success shows actual real world results in market share and profits. So far I haven’t seen any. Neither have the IT guys here at work.

    Aren’t you MAC lemmings tired of MAC’s relentless—and lets face it—creepy pursuit of all things Microsoft? The I-Phone follows Windows Mobile, I-Pods trail Zune, etc. Maybe if MAC developed a genuine business strategy instead haphazardly duplicating Microsoft’s innovations they’d get somewhere.

    Your potential. Our passion.™

  2. So is there any doubt that Apple is going to ride this lead into the itablet /islate thing coming out next year? No one else can touch this.

    I see the table/slate as a color Kindle/ Nook like thing + all the Itunes content including apps as the part that blows the other readers out of the water.

    Technologically we know apple hasn’t stood still

    -Apple will leverage the battery technology to allow for color screens that they developed for the macbook pros for long battery life –
    – SD storage will be incorporated somehow. User expandible sharable etc. Thats why all new max have this built in (save for one but you gotta have a upgrade path somehow).

    – The only mystery to me is input. Call me old fashion or simply someone with pudgy fingers (or both) , but the Iphone keyboard or cell phone keyboards remain difficult input solutions. I leave it Apple’s genius engineers to come up with a scathingly brilliant solution which they usually do.

    @ Zune Tang – Since you have the inside track on all things Microsoft (as per the IT Guys at your work) any read when the Microsoft Courier will be coming out before Xmas? That would be amazing.

  3. I think it’s high time Apple was inducted into the DOW.

    They could easily, IMO, displace Home Depot or Caterpillar as a more attractive investment.

    When whole industries begin to make billions off Apple’s presence in the market, the Street should be rewarding Apple for their business acumen.

  4. Zune Tang is just reminding us what the MS press is like.

    Had my head shaking when I heard the Macs were toys instead of real computers, because they didn’t have enough software games.

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