Analyst: Most Canuck iPhone users ‘not yet into the guts’ of what Apple’s device can really deliver

“Most of Canada’s iPhone users seem to prefer the multimedia device for talking,” Luann Lasalle reports for The Canadian Press. “After all of the complaints about the cost of operating the new, faster iPhone, its owners don’t appear to be using the smartphone to its fullest for web surfing, sending photos, watching videos or listening to music. Rogers Wireless said Thursday that just 1.2 per cent of users of the touchscreen iPhone ate up more than one gigabyte of data in the first four weeks after it went on sale July 11.”

“One gigabyte of data would be the equivalent of about 240 songs or downloading a movie on the touchscreen phone,” Lasalle reports. “‘They’re learning how it can be used,’ spokeswoman Liz Hamilton said.”

Lasalle reports, “Rogers added that 95 per cent of its iPhone customers used less than 500 megabytes of data, the equivalent of about 110 songs, and 91 per cent of its customers used just 200 megabytes.”

Lasalle reports, “Analyst Carmi Levi said the numbers show that most users aren’t taking advantage of all of the iPhone’s features. ‘They haven’t yet tapped into the multimedia-rich capabilities of the device and for the most part they’re likely still using it for light web browsing, light email and for the most part voice use,’ said Levy, senior vice-president of strategic marketing at Toronto’s AR Communications Inc. ‘They haven’t really gotten into the guts of what this thing can do.'”

Full article here.

34 Comments

  1. Canadian people are just scared $h!tless about the possible data charges they could be paying if they were to exceed their limit. Having known Rogers for years, they are just affraid of receiving $1700 monthly bill after innocently watching a YouTube video or two, so they just try to stay on the safe side.

  2. Does the data use include Wi-Fi, or is it just 3G/Edge.

    I use the iPhone a lot more than my previous phone, but the stats say I’ve only used 200 MB of data in the past two months. Then again, I’m using the programs a lot, and transfer songs/movies from my computer.

  3. A problem with the analysis is that it does NOT figure in the use of Wi-Fi. I use my iPhone 3G heavily for both browsing and e-mail, GPS and would likely exceed my monthly 6GB allowance on the Rogers network except that I am typically in shot of a wifi network.

    This has been the case in Vancouver (my home), Ottawa (home away from home) and Toronto. I’ve always been able to connect to the hotels wifi network, coffee shop networks etc.

    My heavy use just does not impact upon the Rogers network nor does it register in the Roger’s statistics.

  4. If what they say is true then Rogers should be happy to sell that package (6 gigs for $30) as they are clearly on the winning end of the bargain and users don’t feel threatened by overage charges.
    Why are the next batch of packages so expensive in comparison?

    Rogers is clearly not about giving the customers a good or even a perceived good deal and therefore are seen as overly greedy.

  5. It’s faster for someone to place music or movies onto the iphone from the computer then trying to download it wirelessly. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”cool smirk” style=”border:0;” />

  6. Unbelievable!

    “Most of Canada’s iPhone users seem to prefer the multimedia device for talking,” Luann Lasalle reports for The Canadian Press. “After all of the complaints about the cost of operating the new, faster iPhone, its owners don’t appear to be using the smartphone to its fullest for web surfing, sending photos, watching videos or listening to music…

    Rogers added that 95 per cent of its iPhone customers used less than 500 megabytes of data, the equivalent of about 110 songs, and 91 per cent of its customers used just 200 megabytes.”

    Based on the fact that AT&T;reported before the introduction of the 3G iPhone that their first generation iPhone customers averaged about 100 MBs per month. This information, in fact, was used in Rogers’ exclamation for not offering an ‘Unlimited Data Plan’ as AT&T;had done, and that the 400 MB Rogers’ plan was more than sufficient for most users.

    Now, unless somebody can show me otherwise, it would appear that Canadian iPhone users, in particular the 95% which used an average just 200 MBs/month appear to be using the iPhone to its fullest more than the Americans who only averaged 100 MBs/month.

    Does not that mean that Canadians used twice as much data usage as the Americans? That we, in fact talk less, i.e., half the time as our neighbours to the south? That, perhaps we have more Wi-Fi connections available? Or that we just have more stupid reporters writing more stupid things?

  7. @DanielM

    You have hit the nail on the head my friend…

    Everyone I know (including myself) with an iPhone here (in Toronto) are using it to it’s absolute fullest… I only clocked 100MB of data in the first month, and I am pulling down loads of YouTube movies, surfing the web, buying apps, etc. And I of course am using WiFi connections at home, at work and lots of places in between.

  8. Well most of the iphone users in Canada have subscribed to a data plan for the first time. They still do not know, how much is too much and are just testing the waters. It was their first data bill. I can assure that this usage is going to increase as time progresses; eventhough most of them will still be around 1 Gb of data users. After all nobody wants to be caught with the outrageous bill for overusage. The good thing is that Rogers is redesigning their data plans effective October this year with text reminder for data use close to the allowance as well as setting a cap at $100 in case of overuse.

  9. Thank you izod.

    And to Bold. Did you not get the memo?

    AT&T;, which provides Unlimited Data in its iPhone plan, means that its customers didn’t have to think, care or worry about how much data they were consuming. In fact, their only concern was that they would have to use Wi-Fi to download large videos if they were not synced to their computers.

    Now, I don’t know about you, but with those conditions, I would assume that everything equal, that their consumption would be higher vs compared to a service that capped their Data Plan as Rogers did. Wouldn’t you?

    But no! We used twice as much. Obviously we are not that ignorant, that we know how to monitor our Data Usage, and we don’t need to wait to see the bill to find out. Just to verify it.

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