Apple releases eighth beta version of iPhone SDK

Apple has released the eighth beta version of the iPhone SDK.

Log in to the iPhone Dev Center and take advantage of all the development resources available to you, including the new version of the iPhone SDK.

This eighth beta release of the iPhone SDK includes a complete set of tools, compilers, frameworks, and documentation for creating iPhone OS applications. These tools include the Xcode IDE, and the Instruments analysis tool, among many others. With this software you can develop applications that run on iPhone and iPod touch using the included iPhone Simulator.

Beta release 8 is compatible with the final iPhone OS 2.0 release and must be used to build and sign any iPhone OS application to be submitted to the App Store. As a reminder, you must be a member of the iPhone Developer Program to submit apps.

More info here.

27 Comments

  1. What’s New
    Beta release 8 is compatible with the final iPhone OS 2.0 release and must be used to build and sign any iPhone OS application to be submitted to the App Store. As a reminder, you must be a member of the iPhone Developer Program to submit apps.

    Others will have to figure out what’s new but ‘secret’.

  2. Great. Now the elite developers that are actually allowed to develop for the iPhone can do so while everyone who isn’t buddy buddy with Steve Jobs is left out in the cold.

    Way to drive “innovation”, Apple; a locked down platform where only special Jobs-approved apps are allowed. It’s not Apple’s business to tell me what I can and can’t do with my phone. I will continue using Jailbreak and not Apple’s crippled, locked-down version of mobile development that forces developers to gain Apple’s approval and take a 30% cut if they want to distribute their applications.

    This new iPhone SDK is a symptom of everything wrong with the internet, but you fanboys lap it up like it’s the greatest thing ever. It’s proprietary and closed. I propose we all boycott the iPhone and its SDK until Apple opens it up and allows some true innovation and creativity to occur.

  3. I’ve got a “reality check” for you — get over it! The solution to your problem is to make your own phone, using Google Android as the operating system. Then you can have all the slow and unreliable interface problems you have been trying to foist on everyone else.

  4. @”Reality Check”:

    I’ll boycott it the second you can show me that any other phone manufacturer offers a better revenue split with a more open SDK of their own on a higher-quality handset.

    In other words, when Apple rolls out revisions to the iPhone SDK, I will boycott their then-obsolete PREVIOUS guidelines with you.

  5. There better be copy and paste hidden in that code. Or else I’ll get a Zune……. to smash with frustration. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”grin” style=”border:0;” />

  6. @Reality Check;

    Please; Go on enjoying your *freedom* and *innovation* with the 5-6 or so *open* programs you’ll be able to install after The App Store opens.

    In 3 weeks, I’ll be livin’ Large with the THOUSANDS of programs written for my *locked down* and *crippled* iPhone.

    You want a “Reality Check”?
    How about you put your money where your mouth is?

    I’m willing to bet you that within 6 months of the App Store’s opening, I’ll have more apps available on my “crippled, locked down” phone than you will EVER have on your hack.

    C’mon c’mon c’mon, I double dog dare you!

    Yeah, you trolls are all the same. Your fanboy’ism for whateveritisyou’rerantingabouttoday is mindless drivel.

    Go buy a ZunePhone (it’ll follow the iPhone in 5 to 7 years), then tell me how *open* MicroSoft’s reply is, won’t you?

    Putz.

  7. I love how you all ignore the real point, which is that it’s not Apple’s place to tell me what I can and can’t do with my phone or iPod, but that is just what the App store allows them to do: decide which Apps they want to allow me to use, and they could object to any app for any reason.

    The fact that you can’t see this is problematic is probably where the whole “Church of Apple” thing came from.

    Would you accept it if Apple decide that from now on, you can only install Apple-approved applications on Macs, and that you can only buy them from Apple stores (online or brick and mortar)? Would you say “Well, it will work better! Look, no more security and quality problems!”? I think not. But how is this any different? You fanboys love to harp on about how the iPhone is basically just a computer, the future of computing, whatever, but when someone points out a flaw, it’s oh, well at least it’s better than the alternatives! Great, lesser of available evils, that’s a great product pitch. Here’s a clue for you: just because everyone else is even worse is no excuse for Apple to join in being evil.

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