Some Apple Mac loyalists turn against Adobe

“Apple Computer and Adobe Systems long have been allies in their underdog struggles against Microsoft. But in the aftermath of Apple’s recent shift to Intel chips, some of Apple’s most ardent fans are aiming bitter attacks at Adobe, the maker of Photoshop and Illustrator graphics programs,” Jon Fortt blogs for Business 2.0. “Their assertion: Adobe is taking too long to release a version of its graphics suite that fully utilizes the new Intel chips.”

Fortt reports, “A typical complaint was posted Tuesday on MacDailyNews, a site whose readers tend to be the most loyal supporters of Apple’s Mac platform. ‘Adobe has known about the switch to Intel LONG before the public did, and they STILL don’t have a Universal version of Photoshop,’ wrote a poster identified as mudflapper. ‘If it wasn’t for diehard Mac designers, photographers and retouchers, Adobe wouldn’t even BE here today.'”

“Though the posts on the MacDailyNews site were by no means uniformly critical — several posters defended Adobe — there was a familiar theme to the attacks. Adobe should be working faster, many implied, because loyal Mac users supported the company in the old days when Adobe was struggling. Apple is a powerful company now, and doesn’t have to take this kind of treatment from Adobe. Some have asserted that Apple buy Adobe. Others have suggested that Apple release more of its own graphics programs to compete with Adobe’s dominant offerings,” Fortt reports.

“Apple has the most to lose from the recent sport of Adobe bashing. Apple wants to rebuild its pro desktop business, and to do that it needs the support of strong pro software players. To grow market share, Apple will need to lure Web designers and cross-platform designers to the Mac — many of those folks use Windows now,” Fortt writes.

“They’re just not going to make the switch if the apps they use (such as Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver and Flash) aren’t supported on the Mac. Adobe gets the sale whether they stay on Windows or make the switch,” Fortt writes. “So Mac fans would be wise to pipe down. Yes, I know it’s frustrating to wait for apps. But sometimes in software, as in politics, diplomacy gets you better long-term results than dropping bombs.”

Full article here.
Pipe down?! Puleeze. Here’s a little business note upfront: Apple Computer. Inc. market value: $67,522,530,080. Adobe Systems, Inc. market value: $21,811,881,140.

Now, in the full article, Fortt seems to severely underestimate the Mac’s market share of the publishing and design markets. Adobe’s Mac customers should never “pipe down” if they are unsatisfied. No unsatisfied customer of any other company should keep quiet or be told to keep quiet, either. The customer is always right (unless you’re Adobe and your customers use Macs). Sorry, but that attitude just doesn’t cut it with us.

Adobe is painfully, obviously, and woefully late with support for Intel-powered Apple Macs. Adobe needs to shut up and start coding. And use Xcode this time.

Hint for Adobe: You should do something meaningful for the Mac users you’ve negatively impacted with your incompetence.

We believe that Adobe isn’t as attentive to Mac users as they should be. It’s up to Adobe to change our minds.

Related MacDailyNews articles:
Adobe manager lashes out at loyal Mac-using customers – October 31, 2006
Adobe Soundbooth audio software released as public beta – October 26, 2006
Apple and Adobe at war? – October 06, 2006
Analyst expects Adobe Creative Suite 3 release on May 1, 2007 – October 04, 2006
How long must we wait for Adobe to produce Universal applications for Apple’s Intel-powered Macs? – August 21, 2006
Adobe CS3 sneak peek shown on Apple MacBook Pro as Universal Binary application – May 25, 2006
Cringely: Apple must replace Microsoft Office, buy Adobe Systems for attack on Microsoft to succeed – April 28, 2006
Adobe CEO: Universal version of Photoshop due in spring 2007 – April 21, 2006
Adobe software engineer explains why Photoshop for Intel-based Macs is taking so long – March 24, 2006
Should Apple buy Adobe as leverage against Microsoft? – December 16, 2005
Adobe prefers (and promotes) PCs over Macs – March 24, 2003

76 Comments

  1. I think i remember reading that :

    50% of the Photoshops sold are Mac versions.

    So the company that has 5-10% of markest share (apple) is buying half of the Adobe PS suites. Time to start showing support , Adobe.

  2. Agree totally with MDN.

    Why does Photoshop take so long to launch on my MacBook Pro Intel Core Duo 2.16GHz with 2GB RAM?

    Because it’s ancient code running in a Rosetta translator, that’s why.

    It’s amazing that Adobe still hasn’t released a solution. I see plenty of other large software developers with Universal Binaries already out.

  3. repost. Said it before, I’ll say it again, Adobe is pushing too hard for mac users to be reasonable and settle for their craptacular attention to the Mac platform

    George Bernard Shaw once observed that reasonable men conform themselves to the world. Unreasonable men expect the world to conform to them. Therefore, any and all progress is the result of unreasonable men.

    This isn’t the first time Adobe has hung Mac users out to dry waiting for photoshop. How long did we wait for a native OS X version?

    Adobe wanted Mac users to be “reasonable” and keep using and buying the OS 9 version. They took long enough to get an OS X version out the door you would think they had already cleaned up the crappy code. Yet here we are again, Strung out waiting, being told we need to be ‘reasonable’ while Adobe tries to get its act together.

    Come on Adobe, get off your lazy butt and start conforming yourself to the world of crazy, hostile, zealots who are waiting to pad your bank accounts with millions of dollars for a decent product that will run natively on our computers.

    Can Adobe really afford to alienate 30-40% of their loyal customer base? Can they afford to let rising in market share Apple develop a pixel-editor app to fill the void left by the non-intel native photoshop?

    Can they really stand by and watch their flagship product go by the wayside like the also ran Premiere after Final Cut Pro came out?

  4. Was this Hillary in disquise writing this article? Pipe down???
    Take the diplomatic approach?? Let’s not made Adobe mad, now folks. (shuddering)
    Fact…core image, core video, core animation, and core audio is an above modern day approach that literally eats Adobe’s lunch.
    In a few years, it will be…Adobe who?? Flash is the only leverage they have long-term, and it’s technology stemmed from a cool little Mac program called Futurewave SmartSketch around eight years ago.
    What a joke for an ending paragraph summarization in this article.
    Let’s take the diplomatic approach with North Korea, too.
    You simply cannot negotiate with a rattlesnake!!

  5. MDN is right.

    Adobe is wrong.

    Apple should buy Adobe and start discontinuing apps for Windows.

    Microsoft would never be able to replace the apps fast enough – they can’t even come close to copying Mac OS X after 5+ years of work. Good luck whipping up a Creative Suite replacement.

    Pull the trigger Mr. Jobs. It’s time.

  6. Spoken about as well as Donald Rumseld:
    “So you ought to just back off, take a look at it, relax….”

    No we won’t back off, relax, or be quiet.

    “We will not be silenced!” Give us Universal Binaries!

  7. I may be in the minority, but I think Adobe’s decision to work on the next version of CS, rather than devote time and manpower to re-coding older products is the right move. I have one intel Mac along with my G4 and G5. I find that Photoshop on the intel runs fine under Rosetta for the moment (doing graphics for video).

    I understand that for designing Posters it may be slow, but I would rather get CS3 quicker.

  8. ?what?…

    Yeah, that totally surprised me. Hope I didn’t come off too angry.

    But really, a free Universal Binary patch would’ve been so nice. Just a little gesture of goodwill to Adobe’s loyal Mac customers. Shoot, even Aspyr has been releasing free UB updates to old-ass games. Now there’s a company that loves the Mac platform and it’s users.

    m

  9. Here is the problem

    Adobe certainly doesn’t intentionally want to p-off Mac users, they had a huge task retooling their development from CodeWarrior (I believe) to Xcode, they had/have to now maintain two development strategies one for Windows & one for Mac (too bad apple doesn’t extend Xcode to build Win apps).

    And heres the rub, the perception of the Mac “faithful” that they have been slighted, is not good for Adobe, peoples perception are their reality, and this is the issue that Adobe has to address.

    If Adobe is astute as I believe them to be they will address the delay, albeit likely with marketing hype they will introduce a better than windows application to placate the Mac faithful.

    just my thoughts

    MW: wish, as in I wish!

  10. I agree with every single word:

    “Adobe is painfully, obviously, and woefully late with support for Intel-powered Apple Macs. Adobe needs to shut up and start coding. And use Xcode this time. Hint for Adobe: You should do something meaningful for the Mac users you’ve negatively impacted with your incompetence. We believe that Adobe isn’t as attentive to Mac users as they should be. It’s up to Adobe to change our minds.”

  11. “Yes, I know it’s frustrating to wait for apps. But sometimes in software, as in politics, diplomacy gets you better long-term results than dropping bombs.”

    This little quote gives me cause to use the eff word here, which I’ve only done once before on MDN, but let’s just say, for now, that it seems that most Adobe using Macsters are not being fooled or bullied for one moment.

    Yes, -sometimes- in politics diplomacy can get you somewhere, but in software sales blackmail will never work, at least not with Macintosh users. I recommend and approve software products for Macintosh on our production line, and thankfully most of our production line only uses Adobe products as supplimental software for FCP, Motion, et. al. I absolutely guarantee you that I will not ever recommend further purchases of any Adobe produts unless it is ABSOF@#!INGLUTELY necessary. Several points on our video production line are already experimenting with open source tools to see how fast development is progressing, and ultimately to find out if we can transit completely away from Adobe products within the next year or two.

    America is a free market, and no one strong arms me into any product for any reason. Good luck Adobe. –And congradulations on the MS Most-Arrogant-of-the-Year Award.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.