Apple Macs make strong rebound on campuses

“In the beginning, there was Apple. ‘At one point, the Mac was the hot box on campus, for those of us who have gray hair,’ said Kenneth C. Green, founding director of the Campus Computing Project, which studies the role of technology in higher education,” Elizabeth Redden reports for Inside Higher Ed.

“Apple’s chief financial officer, Peter Oppenheimer, announced last week that the company is emerging from its best back-to-school quarter ever for its higher education division, with shipments of Mac portables increasing 49 percent from last year within the sector, the increase driven, Oppenheimer said, by sale of the MacBook and Apple’s successful back-to-school promotions,” Redden reports.

Redden reports, “While Dell continues to grow and remains the overwhelming powerhouse on college campuses, Apple, which rapidly lost its market share on campuses in the 1990s, is now quickly expanding its presence at colleges and universities, according to experts who track both student purchasing and institutional trends. The rise of iTunes and the iPod, Apple’s marketing coup of positioning itself as an especially hip brand, and an overall increase in laptop purchases, a sector in which Apple proves particularly strong among college-aged buyers, all contribute to the trend, said Eric Weil, managing partner of Student Monitor, a national group that tracks college students’ consumer habits.”

“A spring 2006 Student Monitor survey of 1,200 full-time four-year undergraduates at 100 campuses found Apple squarely situated as the No. 2 preference among the 19 percent of college students — equivalent to 1.1 million people nationwide — planning to purchase a computer within the next year. Among those students planning to buy a desktop, 41 percent said they planned to buy Dell and 13 percent Apple, with other companies, including Gateway, HP and eMachines, close behind Apple, with 9, 7 and 6 percent of the pie respectively,” Redden reports.

“Among those buying notebooks — which 68 percent of students who said they would buy a computer within the next year planned to purchase — Dell is still the leader, with 40 percent planning to buy Dell laptops. But Apple, with a 21 percent share, has no close competitor for second-place: HP and Sony Vaio, the next-largest players in the market, have just 6 percent of the share each,” Redden reports.

Full article here.

Related articles:
Nearly half of computers purchased at Harvard this year were Apple Macs – October 27, 2006
Analyst: Apple Mac gains market share, the reason why is significant – October 26, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 5.8% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 6.1% of U.S. market share in Q3 06 – October 18, 2006
Apple Q4 earnings results: $546M net profit on $4.84B revenue, sold 1.61M Macs, 8.729M iPods – October 18, 2006
45-percent of computers purchased at Princeton this year were Apple Macs – October 12, 2006
Gartner: Apple Mac grabbed 4.6% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006
IDC: Apple Mac attained 4.8% U.S. market share in Q2 06 – July 19, 2006

20 Comments

  1. outside in the real world it is happening too

    it’s snowballing now, …then avalanche
    just this last week I know of two switchers who even 12 months ago would never have contemplated going Mac

    the more momentum it gains the more it will continue to gain

    tipping point here we come!

  2. 4 or 5 weeks ago The New Yorker magazine had an article about what high school kids wanted for “back to school.” One of the kids said if one had a PC, that one would have to make excuses for it. “We are owned by Apple,” was one quote. This whole thing is building and is going to blow MS out of the water.

  3. The trend is your friend. And the trend is certainly with Apple these days. There are a lot of people at Apple that have contibuted mightily to Apple’s resurgence, but you have to give it to Jobs for bringing them together and instilling the mission.

  4. “Among those buying notebooks — which 68 percent of students who said they would buy a computer within the next year planned to purchase — Dell is still the leader, with 40 percent planning to buy Dell laptops. But Apple, with a 21 percent share, has no close competitor for second-place

    I would like to know if those specifying Dell, knew of the price differences between the MacBook, and Dell’s counterpart.

    What would the survey results look like when those specifying Dell knew the MacBook cost less than the equivalent Dell?

  5. In the consumer market, Dell remains popular with price-sensitive parents who want a small, ultra-cheap, but durable $600 notebook computer for younger kids. Aside from a more capable Mac mini for home theater, this may be the last hole in their product line that Apple needs to overcome. These people want something that is a genuine throwaway, if a kid accidentally trashes it. They want to be able to cheaply repair or replace it, and not feel bad so about the financial hit…

  6. If you want to get rid of Dells, say at Emory University, do what the head of the IT dept. did a few years ago, refuse to take care of the Apple computers the university was previously committed to. If IT depts. refuse to take care of the Dells in the various schools, then Apple could make them offers they couldn’t refuse. Its the American way!

  7. Oh, well. My son just bought a Dell. It came down to *specific* software titles and price, not features. He knows Macs are better; he knows the Dell doesn’t have built-in iSight, iWorks, etc. But his advisor at grad chool uses Scientific Word and S-Plus. He knows that TeXShop and R run on Macs. But the school gives him Sci-Word and S-Plus, and the Dell – as configured and with ‘find on the web $300 discount coupons’ – is about $500 cheaper.

    Sigh.

  8. It’s about time.

    Since Microsoft has been adjudicated as being guilty of improperly monopolizing, why are IT departments allowed by universities and school systems to manipulate computer purchases by “not supporting” or supporting macs. The institution should be modeling responsible behavior by not promoting illegal or borderline conduct.

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