Cape Cod Times: Macs are competitively priced, super-stable, extremely reliable, don’t get malware

“Walk into any given small business that contains a computer, and the odds are very good that its operating system will be Windows,” Diedre Jurand reports for The Cape Cod Times. “‘Most companies are PC-only,’ said Jason Weinstein, owner of the Hyannis-based technology firm JPW Solutions, which works on both Windows systems and Macs. ‘Some that are heavy into graphics and design are Mac-only, and a few use both.'”

“Windows supporters and owners say that the programs they need – including the word processing program Word and spreadsheet program Excel – cannot run on a Mac, Weinstein said. They used to be right,” Jurand reports.

MacDailyNews Note: Word and Excel debuted on Macintosh before Windows. Word has been available for Mac since 1984. Excel debuted on Mac in 1985, two years before the first Windows version debuted in 1987.

Jurand continues, “IBM, an information technology company that works with Windows systems, was in the business business since the development of PCs, said Alan Goodwin, store manager for Cape Mac. Business applications were originally designed just for Windows systems because of that.”

MacDailyNews Note: If you consider Word and Excel to be business applications, see note above.

Jurand continues, “‘A lot of companies that have Macs now started with them years ago when Adobe was Mac-only,’ Weinstein said. ‘Word, on the other hand, was Windows-only originally, and people have been told they can only get software, like Word, for Windows. That’s true now only if a business needs specialized software that is restricted to Windows, such as some accounting and legal programs.'”

MacDailyNews Note: Again, Word debuted on Macintosh before Windows.

Jurand continues, “Macs are also rumored to be more expensive initially than Windows systems and so are sometimes viewed as a poor PC decision for small businesses, Weinstein said. The Apple base systems are more expensive than baseline Windows systems, as Windows supporters suggest. The tiny Mac mini, Apple’s most basic desktop, starts at $599, and the more typical desktop, the iMac, starts at $1,299, according to the Apple Web site. A baseline Dell desktop starts at $299. Feature for feature, though, Apple and Microsoft PC prices differ by only dollars. A business-ready MacBook costs $35 less than the comparable Dell Latitude D620 notebook, and an iMac is $42 more than the corresponding Dell Precision 380.”

MacDailyNews Take: Ahh, very nice. Sorry for the nitpicking on the Word and Excel stuff.

Jurand continues, “‘If a business is starting from scratch, there’s no reason not to go Mac,’ Goodwin said. ‘There’s a perception that Macs are more expensive, and there was a time that was true. But not anymore. Given the same features, they’re the same price, and Macs don’t require a lot of maintenance.'”

MacDailyNews Take: Now Jurand’s really rolling…

Jurand continues, “”The total cost of ownership for a Mac is 50 to 60 percent less than that of a Windows PC, Goodwin said. Macs have few vulnerabilities that leave them susceptible to viruses and they run on the open-source operating system UNIX, which allows users to download thousands of free applications that would be expensive for Windows users. ‘Macs are super-stable, extremely reliable and don’t get spyware or adware,’ he said. ‘That said, there are some instances for businesses where it doesn’t make sense to get Macs. If a business system is already set up on Windows, it may be difficult to switch to Macs. And most businesses can be run off of spreadsheets and word processors. If all you’re doing is word processing, the system doesn’t matter. But if you’re on the Internet at all and you get spyware and adware and a virus that shuts the system down, how much is that going to cost?'”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Pat N.” and “LinuxGuy and MacProdigal Son” for the heads up.]

MacDailyNews Take: Started a little rough, but Jurand sure finished with a bang. Not bad for The Cape Cod Times. Not bad at all!

19 Comments

  1. The fact is

    As long as a buisness keeps it’s Windows PC’s off the internet and take certain file precautions, combined with Dell’s flexible configuration options, they can incur a cheaper per unit cost than with Apple’s “you take what we give you”, product line.

    Mac’s may be more cost effective in the long run, but a buisness is designed to make money and sometimes it’s not wise to spend $600 a computer when they can pay half that and still get the job done.

    Cheap sells unfortunatly.

  2. “They used to be right,” Jurand reports.”

    When were they right about Word and Excel being on a Mac? They ewren’t which just goes to show the incessant FUD and inability of people to understand basic facts until they are shoved in your face.

    One of the big problems is that these days there are a lot of people who really don’t know technology. When they run into someone who knows even a little more than they do, that person is suddenly the expert.

    I know these people. I’ve met these people. They are no experts.

    Sadly, they are also the ones who are guilty of spreading the incessant FUD about Macs, and it must be true, since those people are ‘experts’.

    All I can say is, I think the Apple stores are starting to sway the masses a little, and decrease the FUD somewhat. If someone would only be so kind as to email this ‘writer’ the link to directions to the closest Apple store, she might learn something.

  3. “Started a little rough, but Jurand sure finished with a bang.”

    There is a reason he started rough. I think he was putting the PC fan boys at ease, and then let them have it in the middle to get their attention. At then hit them over the head at the end, as they lay ion the floor in their own puddle of drool, wondering why they just bought a Dell.

  4. “Word and Excel debuted on Macintosh before Windows. Word has been available for Mac since 1984. Excel debuted on Mac in 1985, two years before the first Windows version debuted in 1987.”

    You’re only half-right.

    Microsoft Word was released in 1983 for DOS.

    You’re right about Excel, though. In fact, Excel was ported to Windows from the Mac. It’s interface became officially enshrined as Microsoft’s “Multiple Document Interface” (MDI), which is why Excel had it’s useless “application window” to hold the menu bar.

  5. I’m not buying the “if you started on Windows (PC), stay on Windows” bit.

    I was talking to a PC tech last week who has a fully tricked out PC at home built about the fastest P4, with a Gig of ram and a fast video card. He told me when he tried the Vista beta and “rated” his system, it scored a “1”, the lowest possible qualifying system. Said you’d need a Core duo system to get a decent score.

    This basically means, if you’re already on PC, you’re going to have to buy a new machine anyway come next “whenever” Vista appears just to easily run it.

    Only a fool would see all the benefits of the Mac and then go right back out and buy all new PC systems for their biz.

    I think the Cape Cod Times’ advice was a little short sighted… at best.

  6. “That said, there are some instances for businesses where it doesn’t make sense to get Macs. If a business system is already set up on Windows, it may be difficult to switch to Macs.”

    This should read “if a business has BESPOKE software set up on Windows..”

    If it isn’t bespoke, they’ll be fine to switch..

  7. “MacDailyNews Note: Word and Excel debuted on Macintosh before Windows. Word has been available for Mac since 1984. Excel debuted on Mac in 1985, two years before the first Windows version debuted in 1987.”

    Actually, Excel grew out of MultiPlan – a spreadsheet made by M$ for the Mac in late 84 or early 85. I believe Excel didn’t pop out until late 86.

  8. This basically means, if you’re already on PC, you’re going to have to buy a new machine anyway come next “whenever” Vista appears just to easily run it.

    You’re also going to have to buy a PC with Vista pre-installed, if you want to be sure of having a system that works at all.

    Remember the thread on Vista drivers last week? There are going to be two Vista lines (among six Vista versions), 32-bit and 64-bit, and each will need its own specific set of drivers. Every current PC owner can only pray that the drivers for their combination of hardware & Vista version will become available.

    IMO Vista is a great opportunity to switch to Mac & forget the whole Windows mess.

  9. “MacDailyNews is entirely correct. MS Word debuted on Mac before it did on Windows.”

    I added the emphasis. Yes, Microsoft Word debuted on the Mac before Windows. But then again, the Mac debuted before Windows. In any event, MDN is technically correct and I take it all back.

    Word debuted on DOS in 1983. But I’d bet that Microsoft sold more Word for Mac than Word for DOS…

  10. When they ported Word and Excel to Windows, didn’t they also copy the version numbers of the Mac? I think the Mac was up to v6 and Microsoft didn’t want to let Windows users feel left behind at versions 1 and 2.

  11. Interestingly, one legacy of Word for DOS survives to this day — In Word:mac 2004, go to Preferences > General and select the “Blue background, white text” option: the original color scheme from the 24 by 80 character DOS application.

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