Transitive accelerates RISC migration with Intel; extends virtualization for Intel Xeon, Itanium 2

Transitive Corporation, the leading provider of software that enables transportability of applications across multiple processor and operating system pairs, today announced that it will work with Intel Corporation to accelerate the migration of SW application codes from legacy RISC environments to the Intel Itanium 2 and Intel Xeon processor families. The companies will focus on developing QuickTransit Hardware Virtualization Technology Products for market release this year.

“One of the biggest barriers to upgrading from one computer architecture to another is just how to migrate the installed base of in-house developed software and commercial software,” said Bob Wiederhold, President and CEO of Transitive Corporation in a statement. “With Intel, we are focused on providing binary translation technology products to easily shift existing legacy code or application packages that have been compiled on non-Intel platforms to run without modification on Intel Itanium and Intel Xeon processor-based platforms.”

“Based on strong customer demand to migrate off RISC architectures, Intel is working closely with Transitive to accelerate migration to Intel Itanium processor-based platforms,” said Kirk Skaugen, Vice President, Digital Enterprise Group at Intel Corporation in a statement. “Customers can expect to see outstanding performance of their RISC-based binaries on Intel Itanium based systems coupled with Transitive’s QuickTransit dynamic binary translation products.”

Intel will provide funding and access to key engineering resources to facilitate the ongoing development and testing of QuickTransit for Intel Xeon processors and QuickTransit for Intel Itanium processors. Intel will also work with Transitive to promote the use of QuickTransit technology to computer manufacturers, independent software vendors internal software development groups, IT services companies, and end-customers.

Transitive Corporation is a pioneer and leader in providing solutions that allow the transportability of software applications across multiple hardware platforms. The company’s QuickTransit hardware virtualization technology allows software applications that have been compiled for one processor/operating system to run on another without any source code or binary changes and at speeds comparable to native ports. The technology dramatically reduces software developers’ cost, risk, and time-to-market of supporting multiple hardware platforms, facilitates computer companies’ migration to new computer platforms, and makes significantly more software available on hardware platforms. QuickTransit technology provides the engine for Apple’s Rosetta translation software, and is currently shipping on all of Apple’s Intel-based computers. It is also shipping on all Silicon Graphics’ Linux/Itanium-based computers. Transitive Corporation is located in Los Gatos, California, with a research and development team in Manchester, England. The company is privately held, with funding participation by Pond Venture Partners Ltd., Manchester Technology Fund, Crescendo Ventures and Accel Partners.

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Related articles:
Increasing RAM improves Mac OS X’s ‘Rosetta’ performance – January 25, 2006
Technology behind Apple’s Rosetta wins Wall Street Journal’s 2005 Technology Award – November 11, 2005
The core of Apple’s Rosetta: Transitive founder Rawsthorne named InfoWorld Innovator for 2005 – August 04, 2005
Transitive lies at heart of Apple’s Rosetta translation tech for upcoming Intel-based Apple Macs – June 08, 2005

15 Comments

  1. Can’t you see why Intel is funding this?

    Sure it allows transfer across platforms and that sounds good to the ear, but usually what happens over time is the major platform snuffs out everyone else, that’s the real purpose.

    No more competition means no more innovation, which means stagnation and collaspe.

    Another nail in the coffin of the PC.

    Soon we will all be using dedicated devices like Treo’s, Palms and Playstations with software made only by big developers with the money to pay high licensing fee’s.

    Gone will be free, open source, innovative and small specialized software ventures.

    And yes, we will all be using Microsoft software on Microsoft hardware.

    How Apple will remain “different” when only the operating system seperates them from the majority remains to be seen.

    I think we will be coaxed into Vista eventually. 🙁

  2. 64 bit Intel dual cores at 2.3 Ghz are coming out in September which will give only a mild speed bump over the present Altivec based G5 dual cores.

    It’s taking some time for Intel to catch up with the G5 that’s for sure.

    So we have until September to buy a Quad PPC G5, the last, DRM, EFI and Trusted Computing “free” Mac that will be able to process full 1080p without a problem.

    After that, it’s complete media lockdown with Mac OS X “Lepoard”

    Get your Quad and EyeTV 500 and 200 now if you want to play. HDCP strippers are available if you know where to look.

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