Apple quashes OSx86 rebellion

“The folks at Apple must be nervous. What else would explain why the world’s most rebellious technology company would be out squashing a rebellion? I’m talking about the OSX86 rebellion,” Tom Gromak writes for The Detroit News. “What’s OSX86? It’s the long-awaited marriage of the Macintosh OSX operating system with Intel’s x86 architecture (so-named for the original processor with the code number 8086 and all those that followed). It’s not a beautifully orchestrated reception at MacWorld. It’s more like a Vegas-style cheapo-chapel wedding hatched by a bunch of rogue hackers, crackers and posers who want OSX to run not on Apple’s blessed hardware, but on their own.”

“I’m one of them,” Gromak writes. “A few weeks ago, I got my hands on a hacked and patched version of Apple’s 10.4.3 Tiger operating system. It was the culmination of a scheme that began late last year with my last PC motherboard upgrade to a speedy 3GHz Intel dual-core processor. When the hacked version dropped in my lap in late January, I was elated. I quickly formatted a hard drive, slipped in the CD, and thirty minutes later, I was running OSX on a home-built PC. I was amazed… Apple says it has no plans to sell the operating system apart from its hardware. It’s taken the extra step of going after a couple of key Web sites in the OSX86 movement, including the excellent OSX86project.org, a site for all sorts of Mac enthusiasts and switchers. And that’s too bad. But then, they are in the business of selling computers. And I’ve enjoyed the experience so thoroughly that I may just have to pony up the cash to buy one.”

Full article here.

Advertisements:
Apple’s brand new iPod Hi-Fi speaker system. Home stereo. Reinvented. Available now for $349 with free shipping.
Apple’s new Mac mini. Intel Core, up to 4 times faster. Starting at just $599. Free shipping.
MacBook Pro. The first Mac notebook built upon Intel Core Duo with iLife ’06, Front Row and built-in iSight. Starting at $1999. Free shipping.
iMac. Twice as amazing — Intel Core Duo, iLife ’06, Front Row media experience, Apple Remote, built-in iSight. Starting at $1299. Free shipping.
iPod Radio Remote. Listen to FM radio on your iPod and control everything with a convenient wired remote. Just $49.
iPod. 15,000 songs. 25,000 photos. 150 hours of video. The new iPod. 30GB and 60GB models start at just $299. Free shipping.
Connect iPod to your television set with the iPod AV Cable. Just $19.

Related MacDailyNews articles:
Apple restricts access to Mac OS X source code bits in effort to curb Mac OS X on x86 hacks – February 24, 2006
Apple’s Mac OS X 10.4.4 for Intel cracked – February 15, 2006

49 Comments

  1. So Gromak advocates stealing Apple’s hard-earned IP. ‘Nuff said about him. One of the main reasons Apple won’t release a version of Mac OSX for generic Intel hardware is that it would put them in the same position as Microsoft: Having to pinp their OS in order to keep profits up.

    And that’s only one reason — there are many more.

  2. wait a sec, I think the last line of the Article is the most important and really really needs some consideration.

    “(…)But then, they are in the business of selling computers. And I’ve enjoyed the experience so thoroughly that I may just have to pony up the cash to buy one.”

    Now this is VERY important as it talks about another possible promotional mechanism for Apple which they didn’t have before.
    The “LIVE” CD something that Linux and BeOS users have been familiar with for a while which allows there os to run in a demo mode from a cd on a regular windows computer, enabling the regular winblows user to experience OSX in its full glory and proding them to buy a mac instead of their Dell.
    This would really really be a good marketing tool, and what this guy is saying is that even though he builds his own PC’s and is a harware entusiasts who likes to thinker, he will spend cash on a machine JUST to continue running OSX which he was able to experience because of this “unfortunate” but usefull hack.

  3. It’s software. Stealing software doesn’t actually hurt anybody, guys. It’s not like people make money off of it or anything. It’s a totally faceless crime where everybody wins. : /

  4. Mac OS X is like crack,

    the first hit is free, then your hooked

    then your selling your children into poverty to have the latest Apple device

    In fact my children are presently working in that new Cupertino sweat shop, but it keeps me in the cool zone.

  5. Not to mention that if the OS86 got out into the wild and everybody could install it on their system, this would probably force Apple down the path of incorporating things like product activation into their OS. What a pain that would be.

  6. Tom Gromak wrote: “But then, they (Apple) are in the business of selling computers. And I’ve enjoyed the experience so thoroughly that I may just have to pony up the cash to buy one.”

    This sums it up. Let Windows users experience OS X and iLife. A good percentager will consider converting with their next computer purchase.

  7. My quick note to the author:

    I have no idea who you are, but I’m shocked. Doesn’t happen to me often. Have you publicly endorsed theft under the guise of rebellion before? I actually find it funny that your article opens with Apple being nervous. Perhaps the author should be a bit nervous admitting to receiving stolen property, then bragging about it for the world to see.

  8. A shame they though I understand why Apple will not just sell OS and a few nice apps (hardware issues are major when you have to support any & every bit of kit), I was disappointed when they hammered the sites that were looking at doing “at your own risk” versions of OSX on x86.
    A lot of Linux users would love to try out OSX on intel but would sooner have a “play” first (knowing there may be odd hardware issues) rather than have to shell out for a whole Apple box in case they find they do not like OSX after buying a Mac.

  9. Not being able to afford something is not a justification for theft.

    Paraphrasing General Tagge:
    “What of the Rebellion? If the Rebels have obtained a complete technical reading of this (operating system), it is possible, however unlikely, they might find a weakness and exploit it.

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.