Apple Mac OS X forerunner used to create World Wide Web

“The European research facility, where the World Wide Web was invented, is 50 years old today. CERN (The European Organization for Nuclear Research) is based in Geneva, Switzerland, and is host to the world’s largest lab dedicated to particle physics,” Macworld UK reports. “While its principal function is gather information from a massive underground complex in which atoms are smashed together at high speeds in order to understand the beginning of the universe, its by-product of inventing the Web is far more well known.”

“British-born Sir Tim Berners-Lee created a hypertext program to make it easier to organize, link and browse information on the Internet via a user-friendly means. During a lecture last year at the Royal Society in London, Berners-Lee revealed that he invented the World Wide Web using a NeXT computer. He presented his lecture using Apple’s OS X Web browser Safari on a PowerBook, and referenced the Web’s potential by talking about the possibilities of iCal, Apple’s calendar program,” Macworld UK reports.

Full article here.

44 Comments

  1. mac dood:

    Is this a spoof? How does Whitehead suppose that one does get connected worldwide?

    The internet is simply the electronic road on which packets of information travel. This is like suggesting that interstate highways are doomed to historical irrelevancy because of drunk drivers causing death and injury.

    Lets get rid of the “drunk drivers” such as Windows users. Happy motoring, Mac heads.

  2. I read an interview with Berners-Lee years ago in which he stated (somewhat tongue-in-cheek) that he wrote the proposal for the Web so that he could justify his request for a NeXT box to his superiors at CERN. Amusing and interesting guy. He is one of my innovation heroes.

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