“The Living Computers: Museum + Labs in Seattle is home to some of the most noteworthy machines ever created,” Kurt Schlosser reports for GeekWire.But a new exhibit opening this week will showcase what one official at the Paul Allen-founded institution called ‘the most important computer in history.'”

“Lāth Carlson, executive director of Living Computers, added to that designation by saying the metal box with a keyboard is ‘also the most boring to look at.’ But for fans of computing and Apple in particular, the Apple I that once sat in founder Steve Jobs’ office is exciting for a whole host of reasons,” Schlosser reports. “The machine is the centerpiece of a new permanent Apple Computer Exhibit opening on Friday at the museum, in which visitors are invited to more closely examine the first two decades of Apple and the impact that the company’s people and products had on personal computing and the world as we know it today.”

The Apple I computer, in a prototype metal case, that co-founder Steve Jobs used as a demo model and which was taken from a shelf in his office in 1985. Photo: Living Computers)

The Apple I computer, in a prototype metal case, that co-founder Steve Jobs used as a demo model and which was taken from a shelf in his office in 1985. Photo: Living Computers)


 
“The Jobs machine will be displayed alongside another Apple I, billed as the only operable version of the company’s first-ever product that will also be available for use by the public,” Schlosser reports. “Carlson said the machine, housed in a prototype metal case, was one that Jobs and Apple’s first investor, Mike Markkula, would take on the road to demonstrate its capabilities to potential investors. It had even been modified by Bill Fernandez, the first employee that Apple ever hired.”

Much more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Among others, UNIVAC I begs to differ, but that particular Apple I certainly has a legitimate claim to the title of “most important computer in history” — even though a decade or so from now, that title might rightfully be bestowed upon iPhone.

SEE ALSO:
One of eight working Apple 1 computers goes up for auction; price estimated between $190,000 and $320,000 – March 16, 2017
Rare Apple 1 goes for $815,000 in auction – August 26, 2016
Rare Apple 1 with original first manual written by Apple co-founder Ronald Wayne up for auction – October 19, 2015
Woman unwittingly drops off $200,000 Apple 1 at recycling center – May 31, 2015
Fully-operational Apple 1, sold sold directly by Steve Jobs, could fetch $600,000 at December auction – November 3, 2014
Apple 1 computer sells for $905,000 at auction – October 22, 2014
Apple 1 computer sells for $387,000 in Christie’s auction – July 9, 2013
Original Apple 1 computer sells for $374,500 in auction – June 15, 2012

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Fred Mertz” for the heads up.]