“Apple’s next iPhone will reportedly be the first to sport wireless charging, according to a report,” Rhiannon Williams reports for The Telegraph. “Support for the QI charging technology, which charges phones when they are placed on and inductive pad, will feature in the new model, a source told Fast Company.”

“The iPhone 7 will also boast a waterproof body thanks to chemical coating and will do away with the iPhone’s headphone jack, as previously reported,” Williams reports. “The Apple Watch was the company’s first product with inbuilt inductive charging, which uses a magnetic connector that snaps onto the back of the device. Should Apple choose to incorporate the technology, iPhone owners could take advantage of Ikea’s wireless charging furniture range, alongside charging hubs in Starbucks and McDonalds across the country.”

“The decision to remove the headphone jack in order to create a thinner body would prove a controversial one. The company would presumably include new wireless headphones with the new handset, or a pair of headphones which connect to the phone through a lightning connector,” Williams reports. “The source added the company was likely to incorporate noise-cancelling technology from UK audio company Wolfson Microelectronics which aim to eliminate background noise.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Apple is often the first to abandon outdated technology. Apple will take the hit for everyone else as they did when they eschewed the floppy, SCSI, the optical drive, Adobe’s Flash, etc.

Yes, Lightning can allow for thinner designs. Lighting is also digital. It can deliver power to noise-canceling headphones. Plus, Apple might be working on even more cool things for Lightning earphones: Witness Apple Inc.’s U.S. Patent No. 8,655,004: “Sports monitoring system for headphones, earbuds and/or headsets.”

Apple’s patent abstract: A monitoring system that can be placed proximate to the head or ear of a user is disclosed. According to one embodiment, the monitoring system can be used with headphones, earbuds or headsets. The monitoring system can, for example, be used to monitor user activity, such as during exercise or sporting activities. The positioning of the monitoring system can also facilitate sensing of other user characteristics (e.g., biometric data), such as temperature, perspiration and heart rate. The monitoring system can also be used to control a an electronic device. In one embodiment, the monitoring system facilitates user control of the electronic device using head gestures. More info here.

From your ear to your wrist in the blink of an eye™.

Plus, if you’d prefer no wires at all, you can do as we do and go Bluetooth. We’ve been using wireless Jaybirds for some time now (currently the Jaybird X2 Sport Wireless Bluetooth Headphones). They’re easy to charge, light and comfortable, and work perfectly with our Apple Watches and iPhone 6s Plus units.

SEE ALSO:
The fastest Lightning cable is also one of the least expensive – January 8, 2016
Apple will drop headphone jack to make the iPhone 7 super slim, source confirms; wireless charging and waterproof, too – January 7, 2016
Petition demands Apple keep 3.5mm headphone jack in the ‘iPhone 7’ – January 7, 2016
More reports claim Apple has dumped the 3.5mm headphone jack on iPhone 7 – January 5, 2016
Why Apple may axe the 3.5mm headphone jack – June 20, 2014
Apple may be poised to kill off the 3.5mm headphone jack – June 7, 2014
Apple may ditch analog 3.5mm headphone jack for Lightning to make thinner devices – June 6, 2014
Apple introduces MFi specs for Lightning cable headphones, iOS software update to deliver support – June 5, 2014
Apple preps HD audio for iOS 8 plus new Apple In-Ear Headphones and lightning cable – May 13, 2014
Apple patents biometric sensor-packed health monitoring earphones with ‘head gesture’ control – February 18, 2014
Apple paves way for more affordable iOS accessories with lower MFi and Lightning licensing fees – February 7, 2014