“There’s a reason why we tech writers are so endlessly fascinated by the story of Apple,” Omar L. Gallaga writes for CNN. “The rise, fall and stunning rise again of the tech company has, over several decades, been like watching a really good, long-running cable TV drama — in particular, a relentlessly tense and engrossing one called ‘Breaking Bad.'”

“Most obviously, Apple’s story mirrors that of ‘Breaking Bad’ in the way the TV show began: Walter White, a chemistry teacher, is diagnosed with terminal cancer and decides to use his science skills to cook methamphetamine. He takes shocking, out-of-character risks but reinvents himself as a brilliant, feared meth chemist who grows more ambitious, ruthless and cocky with each victory,” Gallaga writes. “It’s hard not to think of Apple co-founder and longtime CEO Steve Jobs, who fought pancreatic cancer from 2003 until his death last year. It was during this period that Jobs rebuilt Apple from a struggling also-ran into the most influential and profitable tech company in history, releasing a string of industry-changing products from the iPhone to the MacBook Air to the iPad.”

MacDailyNews Take: Jobs never struck us as growing particularly cocky in his second coming – certainly not when compared to his youthful self during his first stint at Apple.

Gallaga writes, “What makes Apple so successful? Like Walter White, it has mixed the proper elements at just the right amounts to create highly pure, addictive products. The products have been made within secretive working conditions. The skill employed to design and manufacture them tends to make what competitors put out seem like cheaper, cloudier, less effective imitations.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader "Edward W." for the heads up.]