Apple Silicon roadmap: 3nm Mac and iPhone chips coming in 2023

The Information reports Friday that Apple has plans for even faster second- (upgraded 5nm) and third-generation (3nm) Apple Silicon chips in the next few years.

M1, M1 Pro, and M1 Max form a family of chips that lead the industry in performance, custom technologies, and power efficiency.
M1, M1 Pro, and M1 Max form a family of chips that lead the industry in performance, custom technologies, and power efficiency.

Benjamin Mayo for 9to5Mac:

The M1, M1 Pro and M1 Max are fabricated on a 5-nanometer process. The report says Apple will follow up with second-generation Apple Silicon chips in 2022, using an upgraded 5-nanometer process…

Apple and foundry partner TSMC plan to produce 3-nanometer chips for Macs as soon as 2023. These could feature as many as four dies, with up to 40 CPU cores in total per chip. The three versions of the third-generation chip apparently are codenamed “Ibiza,” “Lobos,” and “Palma.”

The roadmap suggests that Apple will continue to “easily outperform Intel’s future processors for consumer PCs.”

MacDailyNews Take: In a nutshell: Apple and TSMC have thoroughly embarrassed Intel and AMD and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, first with upgraded 5nm and then unbelievably powerful and efficient 3nm chips.

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[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Fred Mertz” for the heads up.]

8 Comments

  1. I don’t see that you have made any point here. Are you saying that TSMC is going to make chips for Wintel? And that will make Windows machines compete? Are you saying that Samsung will buy chips from TSMC instead of using Samsung’s own fab? Are you saying that TSMC will suddenly lose its ability to continue its trajectory? I truly do not see what point you are trying to make.

    1. There are other companies other than Intel, but once 3 nm is achieved it can be technically be applied to any chipset, not just Apple and not just ARM. Maybe even Intel. Think out side your Apple crate.

      And I remind you that Apple doesn’t own a fab. They own chip designers, not chip makers.

  2. These days MDN likes to bash Intel even though MDN routinely and loudly sang Intel’s praises a dozen or more years ago. Plus, “Apple and TSMC have thoroughly embarrassed Intel and AMD and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future” does not ring true as of this past week. Intel’s latest 12th generation chips significantly beat even the M1 Max in both single core scores and multi core scores. If Apple puts the exact same M1 Max in the top of the line iMac in the next few months it will be impossible for them to honestly claim that specific iMac is the fastest thing out there.

    Intel was able to increase single core scores by an average of 19% (verified by independent labs) and multi core scores by 20% to over 100% dependent upon the application running (again verified by independent labs).

    Intel is starting to turn that huge ship around. The two questions are 1) will it continue to increase capabilities and 2) will these improvements show up across all their processors not just their flagship processors?Only time will tell.

  3. Good luck with that. I hope TSMC can deliver on its promises. Meanwhile, Intel will be pushing its 12th generation Alder Lake as the King of all Processors and likely putting up more ads about how it’s going to destroy Apple’s latest M1 variations at every task possible. I’m going to be very disappointed if Intel has an unlimited supply of Alder Lake i9s to pass on to all the Windows PC makers. Fortunately, those chips will require new motherboards for the chip size and new DDR5 RAM. Hopefully, Windows PC makers will run into supply problems for new components, but that’s just a longshot.

    I’d like to see Apple’s 40-core chip but that’s only for bragging rights. The current M1s are more than fast enough for anything I need to do. I’m really curious about what Apple is going to do for a discrete GPU which I’m sure must be necessary to compete with the best GPUs that AMD or Nvidia can produce.

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