Facebook unveils ‘Ray-Ban Stories’ smart glasses

Facebook launched its first smart glasses on Thursday, called “Ray-Ban Stories,” in a step toward its aim of offering true augmented reality (AR) glasses.

Ray-Ban Stories
Ray-Ban Stories glasses

Elizabeth Culliford for Reuters:

The glasses, which were created in partnership with Ray-Ban maker EssilorLuxottica, allow wearers to listen to music, take calls or capture photos and short videos and share them across Facebook’s services using a companion app. Facebook said the glasses line, called “Ray-Ban Stories,” would start at $299.

Facebook’s chief scientist said last year the company was five to 10 years away from being able to bring to market “true” AR glasses, which would superimpose virtual objects onto the wearer’s view of the real world.

The glasses include an optional virtual assistant so photos and videos can be captured hands-free through voice commands. Facebook said an LED light on the glasses would show when the camera is on, to make other people aware when a wearer is taking a photo or video.

It published a guide outlining how to use the glasses responsibly, for example turning them off in private spaces like public bathrooms and not using them for illegal actions like harassment or capturing sensitive information such as PIN codes.

MacDailyNews Take: Sure, put these on and let Facebook, the skeaziest of the skeazy social media outfits, track what you’re looking at and recording. Sounds like a great idea!

By the way, an LED light can easily be covered, making other people completely unaware when a wearer of “Ray-Ban Stories” (stupid name) is capturing photos or shooting videos.

BTW, again, this is why Apple is foolish (or, perhaps, compromised) to squander their privacy bona fides because they’ll need to occupy the privacy high ground if they ever hope to introduce their own smart glasses (that are actually smart, and not just an iPod and two cameras shoved into Bluetooth-enabled sunglasses).

7 Comments

  1. “BTW, again, this is why Apple is foolish (or, perhaps, compromised) to squander their privacy bona fides because they’ll need to occupy the privacy high ground if they ever hope to introduce their own smart glasses (that are actually smart, and not just an iPod and two cameras shoved into Bluetooth-enabled sunglasses).” -MDN

    Agreed! They would’ve needed those bona fides to enter the market. Maybe they can still win over some, but I won’t be contributing to their bottom line. Think I’m kidding? Verizon burned me 15 years ago, I ported my Verizon land-line number to my 1st gen iPhone and haven’t done business with them since (save signing up for a streaming service not realizing it was theirs).

    Tim Crook’s sycophants are trying to do damage control claiming their streaming service has better privacy, so it’s ok that they’re pushing for warrantless searches of user data (presumably on devices owned by minors too?). What a bunch of stooges.

  2. It’s an inditement of Microsoft’s lack of taste that company so well capitalized cannot manifest a fresh, new design and would choose to go with a tired Ray-Ban scheme. The taste deficit of Gates, Allen and Ballmer is alive and well in the new Microsoft.

    1. Speaking of indictments, I can’t recall anyone at Microsoft opening advocating adding warrant-less searches of user data to any of their platforms. If they did it, they at least had enough sense to keep it to themselves.

      The CCP must have some delicious blackmail on Tim Cook. Or perhaps it’s just the simple fact that he has left Apple completely at the ChiCom’s mercy for production. They could shut down Apple on a pretext, and if Tim doesn’t go along, they’ll prove it.

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