Arizona leads multi-state probe into Apple’s throttling of older iPhones

Arizona is leading a multi-U.S. state probe into whether Apple’s deliberate throttling of older iPhones violated deceptive trade practice laws, documents reviewed by Reuters showed.

iPhone 7 Plus
Apple’ iPhone 7 Plus in Jet Black

Reuters:

Last week, a separate document released by a tech watchdog group showed the Texas attorney general might sue Apple for such violations in connection with a multi-state probe, without specifying charges.

In the ongoing probe since at least October 2018, investigators have asked Apple for data about “unexpected shutdowns” of iPhones and the company’s throttling, or slowing down, of the devices through power management software, documents Reuters obtained through a public records request showed.

Earlier this year, Apple agreed to pay up to $500 million to settle a proposed class-action lawsuit related to the battery issues.

MacDailyNews Take: Apple’s very expensive lesson in customer communication – one that could have been completely avoided with the publication of a simple support document that explained the feature – continues.

Apple handled this poorly and deserves to learn a lesson so that the company properly communicates with customers in the future.MacDailyNews, August 1, 2019


There’s no excusing this one. Apple deserves the ongoing headache. Hopefully, when all is said and done and paid, the company will have learned an important lesson about transparency and communication with their customers.MacDailyNews, February 27, 2018


You can see why some think that Apple wanted to keep what they were doing a secret. If people knew that a $79 battery replacement would give them an iPhone that performed like it did on day one, a meaningful percentage would take that option versus buying a new iPhone. Now that it’s just $29 this year, that percentage will naturally increase.

Then again, as Hanlon’s razor states: “Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity.”

Apple’s made up of people. People are imperfect. We’ll take Apple’s word for it that they “always wanted… customers to be able to use their iPhones as long as possible” and that they “have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades.” — MacDailyNews, January 3, 2018


Again, it’s Apple’s lack of communication that is the problem here. If Apple had clearly explained what was going on in the software, we’d know to recommend a battery replacement when users complained their older iPhones were getting “slow.” As it was, we were pretty much left to assume that the processor/RAM wasn’t up to par with demands of newer iOS releases and we’d naturally recommend getting a new iPhone.

Just yesterday, we had a friend complain that his iPhone 6 was acting “slow” and we knew to recommend a battery replacement (even though he instead opted to get himself an iPhone X on our strong recommendation).MacDailyNews, December 29, 2017


As has almost always been the case with Apple, unfortunately, transparency comes later, not sooner, and usually as a reaction to negative publicity. A simple Knowledge Base article would have preempted all of this Reddit sleuthing and the attendant handwringing and erroneous presumptions.MacDailyNews, December 20, 2017

Friday’s settlement covers U.S. owners of the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, 7, 7Plus or SE that ran the iOS 10.2.1 or later operating system. It also covers U.S. owners of the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus that ran iOS 11.2 or later before Dec. 21, 2017.

MacDailyNews Note: If you are or were a U.S. owner of an iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, and/or SE device that ran iOS 10.2.1 or later before December 21, 2017, and/or a U.S. owner of an iPhone 7 or 7 Plus device that ran iOS 11.2 or later before December 21, 2017, you could be entitled to benefits under the iPhone throttling class action settlement. More info here.

3 Comments

  1. Apple is getting spanked for extending the useful lives of older iPhones. Sure, they could and should have been more open and transparent about how the power management feature worked. And I also agree that Apple should have been more proactive about providing a battery replacement program. But the power management strategy really was a useful and practical feature, imo.

    I have to wonder how this would have been handled is Google or Microsoft would have been the perpetrator. Both of those companies have been slapped on the wrist in the past for truly malicious activities. But Apple is heavily fined for this?

    Sounds like some states are seeking easy money from Apple, even as they and the Feds speak ill of the European Union for similar actions.

  2. Still running my 2010 Mac Pro natively on Mojave with new AMD graphics card fully supported. Apple has the longest running and supported hardware in the industry.

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