“Imagine this: Someone buys a car from you, but later files a lawsuit against you, claiming, ‘The car has these seat belts that take too long to put on and can’t be removed. What if I lose the key and can’t open the door? I don’t like how these features were implemented in the car, so I’m suing you,'” Corey Nachreiner writes for Forbes. “My response would be, ‘Give me the car back — no one is safe with you on the road!'”

“Well, that kind of senseless thinking is similar to the logic one plaintiff is using to bring a class action lawsuit against Apple for the company’s use of multifactor authentication (MFA),” Nachreiner writes. “Many of the things the plaintiff alleges aren’t quite true or are greatly exaggerated. While 2FA imposes some extra steps, it improves security without much time required at all. In most cases, Apple doesn’t force 2FA; you have to opt in.”

“The plaintiff didn’t have to turn it on. To me, his suit sounds like the temper tantrum of someone who lost his password and authentication factors (something you really don’t want to do) and is throwing a fit,” Nachreiner writes. “If you don’t like Apple implementing good security, you can choose not to buy its products.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: As we wrote back in February:

Oh, puleeeze. If this one isn’t laughed out of court, no case ever will be.

SEE ALSO:
Apple sued because two-factor authentication is inconvenient – February 11, 2019