Federation Square flagship Apple store labeled ‘Pizza Hut pagoda’ as Melbourne City Council vows to fight design

“A new Apple Store proposed for Federation Square has been labelled a ‘Pizza Hut pagoda’ as the Melbourne City Council voted to step up pressure for a redesign,” James Hancock reports for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

“The Victorian Government approved demolition of the Yarra building closest to the river in December last year to make way for the two storey concept store,” Hancock reports. “Tuesday night’s city council meeting heard the proposal has overwhelmingly been rejected by the community, with the council receiving about 800 submissions rejecting the design.”

“Councillors unanimously backed a motion by Greens Councillor Rohan Leppert to lobby the Government for a new design for the store and public consultation,” Hancock reports. “Councillor Nicholas Reece believes with the right design, an Apple Store could actually improve the square. ‘Provided it’s done in the right way it could be a good thing for Federation Square,’ Cr Reece said. But he said he had not found anyone who liked the design.”

An artist's impression of a planned new Apple concept store at Melbourne's Federation Square. (Photo via Victorian Government)
An artist’s impression of a planned new Apple concept store at Melbourne’s Federation Square. (Photo via Victorian Government)

 

 

Apple will increase the public space within Federation Square and improve access to the Yarra River.
Apple will increase the public space within Federation Square and improve access to the Yarra River.

 
Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Looks more like a glass hamburger to us.

SEE ALSO:
Apple reveals plans for Apple Federation Square flagship store in Melbourne, Australia – December 20, 2017

27 Comments

  1. Going to be a huge benefit to the the Square. The existing design of the area – which will remain largely unchanged – looks like an ugly failure to replicate the Borg planet from Star Trek.

    Looks Japanese inspired which is appropriate given Australia’s geographic location. Also, seems to accommodate against some of the extremely hot weather the city gets over summer.

    Looking forword to visiting the new store when compete, and the great city of Melbourne!

      1. It has been that way since MDN introduced “registered users.” To this day, the value of being a registered MDN user is still unclear to me, other than my name being displayed in blue.

    1. Yes a Certain irony looking at those other buildings, Apples might be a little uninspiring but wow it would be surrounded by true ugliness and worse still ugliness that will date terribly too. I have a great love for Australians but good taste isn’t one of their renown qualities outside of sport anyway.

      1. Not sure where you get that Australia has no reputation for good taste.

        Google the Sydney Opera House and you’ll see an incredible work of modern architecture, respected world wide. Australia was very involved in the early growth of modern architecture.

        Personally I think apple’s design is beautiful. JMHO

  2. Listening to a radio interview with one of the councillors on Monday, it’s clear that the biggest issue with the store isn’t so much the store itself but the process Apple used to get it rubber stamped.

    Apple managed to circumvent a great number of normal planning procedures and oversight to stake its claim on Federation Square, which may not have been the best way of going about things given the community nature of Federation Square and the broader expectation that the public is consulted when the future of Federation Square is up for discussion.

    I think that the store will ultimately find its niche within the weird but loveable mish-mash that is Fed Square. If Apple brought the community along with it in this case, most of the controversy would have been avoided.

  3. If you remove the “Pagoda” part you have a glass cube that’ll get dangerously hot. If you make it look like the other buildings in the area, which look like they were committee designed by committee, you lose the opportunity to have something unique and refreshing that draws visitors. If Apple pushes the design they lose in the court of public opinion. If they give in everyone else will want to design their own Apple building. Any reason they have to build there?

    1. Ah, the nearest “neighboring” city of any worth – Adelaide (pop. 1.2M) – is over 700km away. Australia is a big place with not much population.
      Sydney – over 800km away – already has the original Australian flagship store.
      So neighborhood rivalry is not going to push this one along.

Add Your Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.