Apple Watch crushes wannabes in 2016 J.D. Power smartwatch satisfaction report

Apple ranks highest among manufacturers of smartwatches according to the J.D. Power 2016 Smartwatch Device Satisfaction Report released Tuesday.

The report measures overall satisfaction with smartwatches among customers who purchased a smartwatch device within the past 12 months and examines satisfaction across 11 factors (listed in order of importance): Ease of use, comfort, battery life, phone features, price, strength/durability, display size, styling/appearance, reliability, apps available, and customer service.”

Apple, with a top J.D. Power 5 Power Cycle Rating ranks highest in customer satisfaction (852) with smartwatches and performs particularly well in comfort, styling/appearance and ease of use beating distant second place Samsung (2 Power Cycle Rating, 842, 5 points below average).

J.D. Power 2016 Smartwatch Device Satisfaction Report

watchOS 3 is faster and simpler with breakthrough health features - coming this fall
watchOS 3 is faster and simpler with breakthrough health features – coming this fall

 
The 2016 Smartwatch Device Satisfaction Report is based on responses from 2,696 respondents who purchased a smartwatch within the past 12 months.

Source: J.D. Power

MacDailyNews Take: Total dominance for Apple Watch. With Apple Watch scoring so high, all others are simply below average (as you’d expect from a bunch of stupidwatches) – and all this before watchOS 3 improves the Apple Watch user experience immensely!

SEE ALSO:
Apple Watch satisfaction is unprecedented at 97%; beats original iPhone and iPad – July 20, 2015

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “Albert P.” for the heads up.]

11 Comments

  1. Strange scoring system. The difference between the top and bottom score is 25 points. Out of an average of around 850, that’s a very small standard deviation (the difference from the mean to top/bottom is about +/-12 points or only 1.4%. I would have expected a much wider distribution. Statistically, they’re all the same… (But, of course, WE know they’re not all the same- but the scoring doesn’t really show that, IMHO).

          1. Diminutive in every respect Frankie, a confidence interval gives an estimated range of values which is likely to include an unknown population parameter, the estimated range being calculated from a given set of sample data.

            In applied practice, confidence intervals are typically stated at the 95% confidence level. However, when presented graphically, confidence intervals can be shown at several confidence levels, for example 90%, 95% and 99%.

            Certain factors may affect the confidence interval size including size of sample, level of confidence, and population variability. A larger sample size normally will lead to a better estimate of the population parameter.

            For a population with unknown mean and known standard deviation , a confidence interval for the population mean, based on a simple random sample (SRS) of size n, is + z*, where z* is the upper (1-C)/2 critical value for the standard normal distribution.

            Note: This interval is only exact when the population distribution is normal. For large samples from other population distributions, the interval is approximately correct by the Central Limit Theorem.

            Do you understand the answer?

            Now go FY.

    1. You need to look at the chart legend. Not a single one of the competitors was listed as “Better than Most” or even “About Average”. They were listed as among “The Rest” while the Apple Watch was listed as the only one listed as “Among the Best”.

      1. With a line arbitrarily drawn between scores that are almost the same. 852 is five circles and is “among the best”, while 842 is TWO circles and is classified simply as “The Rest”.

        I have no doubt the Apple Watch is MUCH better… and this tiny difference in score doesn’t reflect it.

        And this rating definitely doesn’t deserve “stark contrast” and “crushes wannabes”.

        1. No, it is not “arbitrary. They are literally “below average” because the Apple Watch is so far and away that far above them in points scores. The cut off point is “average”.

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