How to punish Walmart, CVS, Rite Aid, and others who block Apple Pay

Beyond simply refusing to shop in their stores, if you find yourself in a store you didn’t know was blocking Apple Pay or if you have no other alternative, “when a CVS, a Rite Aid, or another store rejects your phone payment, you can punish them by socking them with transaction fees,” Rob Pegoraro reports for Yahoo Tech. “Instead of using their mobile payment system, whip out your credit card. And not just any credit card, but one with a higher transaction fee.”

“Say you’ve got three cards handy: a regular Visa, a fancier Visa labeled ‘Signature Preferred,’ and an American Express. The first can cost between 1.15 to 1.65 percent for the merchant to accept, the second raises that to 2.1 to 2.4 percent, and the AmEx runs from 2.89 to 3.2 percent,” Pegoraro reports.
(AmEx can pull that off because of its record of attracting spendier shoppers, but it’s not alone in employing this strategy.) Using MasterCard instead? Its ‘World’ cards also cost extra, though not as much.”

“And since most of these premium cards reward your spending with cash or points back, the word for using them to punish a control-freak merchant can be not just ‘priceless,’ but ‘profitable,'” Pegoraro reports. “Perhaps the retailers will get the message and begin to once again let customers pay for goods the way they want to.”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: First and foremost, don’t shop at any Apple Pay blockers, but if you’re stuck, this is a good alternative. We plan to AMEX the ever-living crap out of any retailer we find that’s artificially blocking Apple Pay.

Related articles:
iPhone users and Android settlers raid reviews of CurrentC payments app – October 29, 2014
Retailer-backed MCX Apple Pay rival has already been hacked; testers’ email addresses stolen – October 29, 2014
Why Walmart, CVS and Rite-Aid really hate Apple Pay: They can’t track your buying habits – October 29, 2014
CurrentC retailers’ conundrum: MCX contract expressly bars Apple Pay acceptance – October 29, 2014
Retailers like CVS and Rite Aid that block Apple Pay are taking a big security risk – October 28, 2014
Apple Pay tussle with CVS, Rite Aid the first shot in mobile payments war – October 28, 2014
In one week, Apple Pay already No. 1; used more than all other mobile payment systems combined – October 28, 2014
Alibaba’s Jack Ma says open to working with Apple on Apple Pay – October 28, 2014
Tim Cook blasts CVS, Rite Aid over Apple Pay blockade: ‘You only are relevant if your customers love you’ – October 28, 2014
Seeking personal data, Walmart, Best Buy, and others won’t let shoppers enjoy Apple Pay privacy – October 27, 2014
Boycott CVS and Rite Aid – October 27, 2014
Bad business: CVS and Rite Aid antagonize their most well-heeled customers by blocking Apple Pay – October 27, 2014
CVS stores reportedly disabling NFC to shut down Apple Pay – October 25, 2014
iPhone users earn significantly more than those who settle for Android phones – October 8, 2014
Yet more proof that Android is for poor people – June 27, 2014
More proof that Android is for poor people – May 13, 2014
Apple’s iOS dominates in richer countries, Android in poorer regions – March 25, 2014
Twitter heat map shows iPhone use by the affluent, Android by the poor – June 20, 2013
iPhone users smarter, richer than Android phone users – August 16, 2011
Yankee Group: Apple iPhone owners shop more, buy more, remain more loyal vs. other device users – July 20, 2010

62 Comments

    1. that’s their whole point, these firms are simply trying to bypass paying banks a fee. While ApplePay is the most efficient and easy way to purchase, you’re still paying Mastercard and Visa a transaction fee, which blows donkey dongers.

  1. I’d fill up a cart with junk and when you go to check out and they say they don’t accept Apple Pay then I’d just leave the cart and start walking out and on the way out tell your manager to start accepting Apple Pay.

    1. Exactly, I was thinking to do the same. They are going to have carts and carts full with misplaced merchandise and they have to spend more men /women hours to place everything where they belong again.

    2. Don’t forget to make sure the cart has a lot of perishables, with the lack of efficiency at most walmarts the spoilage alone may make them reconsider.

      Also don’t abandon the transaction until the cashier is done ringing it and bagging it.

      But in hindsight, none of this would matter, as Walmart is trying to save $9.5 Billion by not paying credit fees, a few thousand here and there is rounding error to them.

      1. If you don’t think managers are going to notice lines of shopping carts to be restocked and wonder why, then cashxx isn’t the stupid one. It may be the manager for not doing his job, but it isn’t cashxx. From the manager, it will climb the ladder.

          1. Yep. I know there are idiot managers out there who would ignore it, even fire the employee for taking too long to get the restocking done, but I hope that they are in the minority. One with any management skills would notice and pass it along.

      2. Please leave the employees alone. It’s not their fault, and many of them aren’t happy about it either.

        I was at CVS yesterday, the only CVS location that’s so convenient that going to a Walgreens isn’t really an option, and I mentioned to the lady at the checkout that I was upset that CVS had turned off the NFC at their registers. She didn’t even know about Apple Pay, but when I described it, she said “Oh, yeah! They hold their phone up and it goes beep! They turned that off? Why would they do that?”

        ——RM

  2. Would it not be much better to bring a full trolley to the till and once the don’t accept your payment tell them to keep it and do your shopping elsewhere?
    Imagine all the time they waste on an action like that?

    1. [quote]Would it not be much better to bring a full trolley to the till and once the don’t accept your payment tell them to keep it and do your shopping elsewhere?
      Imagine all the time you waste on an action like that?[/quote]

      Fixed that for ya.

      1. It only doesn’t work if the manager is an idiot. Otherwise, they see that employee “stuck” (doing the job he is paid for, so no biggie to him) restocking. A manager who doesn’t notice that should be fired. One who does notice would ask the employee what is going on, and it will make it to corporate HQ.

  3. Forget the credit cards, whip out a check… It costs the merchant more to process than a credit card and takes more of their time to process.

    BTW the only reason we’re having this discussion is that processing costs for checks and cash are hidden where credit card swipe fees are easier to see.

    1. True. It also takes time for you to write the check and for them to ‘verify’ it by you showing ID and holding up the check-out line all the while. 😀 The ‘visible’ side of a store processing checks.

    2. True.. But there is an additional ‘visible’ side to check processing when you whip out your checkbook, write the check, whip out your ID for the cashier to ‘verify’ the check, and complete the transaction all while you hold up the checkout line and possibly create ill will.

  4. I dislike Amazon but still shop there so here is how I handle it ….

    Make purchases just over their minimum FREE ship amount and I use my AMEX Card for all purchases as AMEX charges merchants the MOST FEES …..

    With WalMart FallApart only if needed and try to use AMEX Card whenever possible, may not be accepted at WalMart don’t know I don’t shop,there and make multiple small purchases rather than large, if not a big hassle ….

    Another idea is to write their customer service and complain!

  5. Assuming you do as the article suggests. Why would they think you wouldn’t have registered those same cards on Apple Pay and used them there and in effect ‘punishing’ them for supporting Apple Pay?

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