After being cut out of iPhone 5 and 5s, Samsung said supplying Apple DRAM for next-gen ‘iPhone 6’

“Key component partner and fierce rival Samsung has reportedly wedged its way back into Apple’s supply chain for the next iPhone, as the South Korean company will allegedly be one of three companies supplying dynamic random-access memory for the ‘iPhone 6,'” Neil Hughes reports for AppleInsider.

“Samsung was actually cut out of Apple’s DRAM business starting with the iPhone 5 and carrying over to the iPhone 5s, according to analyst Timothy Arcuri of Cowen and Company,” Hughes reports. “But for the ‘iPhone 6,’ Samsung has been reportedly brought back into the fold, he said in a note to investors on Monday.”

Hughes reports, “Other DRAM suppliers for Apple’s next-generation iPhone are said to be Micron and Elpida.”

Read more in the full article here.

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20 Comments

  1. Apple is going to buy the best components at the lowest prices. They’re not going to spend a few billion dollars elsewhere simply because Samsung hurt their feelings. It’s not like as if a loss of DRAM business affects their ability to continue to produce phones that compete with the iPhone or tablets that compete with the iPad.

    The transitioning away from Samsung has more to do with the nature of the industry and that there are smaller companies biting at the chance to grab Samsung’s business. For these companies, Apple is in a unique position to bring Billions of dollars to them that they can in turn use to build the infrastructure to produce cost/quality competitive components for Apple.

    In the end, if no company can step up, Apple is going to go with the best price where the quality meets a specified threshold regardless of whether that’s Samsung or any other competitor.

    1. I agree with part of your sentiment, but in counterpoint, giving “anything” to an IP-stealing competitor is a dangerous game.

      To this end, I can see Apple working to curate competition to Samsung’s products, as well as trying to limit one’s purchases with Samsung to “lower tech” commodities (such as DRAM) that has minimal profit margins. Overall, Apple’s shut-off of Samsung for the iPhone 5/5s was very much intended to send a message that Samsung’s activities in certain business units can have impact on other business units.

  2. Samsung are the best supplier of quality components to Apple. Look at all the issues that Apple needs to deal with when other companies supply components for them. LG display issues with MacBook Air Retina, iPhone 5 and 5S and C. The top performing SSD’s come from Samsung and not Toshiba or others. In a perfect world, Samsung should tone down the rhetoric and be more respectful of Apple as their collaborations are unmatched and endless. Both great companies with huge brain thrusts.

    1. Jim (anonymous coward): You credentials are showing. To say Samsung has a ‘huge brain thrust‘ is HiLaRIouS! I have to respond:

      A) If Samsung had brains, they wouldn’t be court convicted plagiarists, would they. When you can’t innovate, imitate.

      B) THRUSTing is about all brain damaged Samsung is good for. You don’t want their baby ladies! Beware.

      Thrust THRUST THRUST those cheap knockoffs into the market! THRUST marketing!

      Samsung: Go thrust yourself.

    2. Dear Brainthrust,

      Thanks for your unique insight into Apple’s supply chain. How long have you and Tim been working together? “Samsung are the best…” – you should have stopped right there, because the rest is unsupportable drivel. How did you ever come that conclusion? No good SSD’s from anyone else? How about Intel. Display problems with iPhone 5s due to LG? What display problem are you referring to? You do know three different companies produce screens, right? And, that most of the problems were with Sharp displays – though the rMBPs are LG’s screen issues. You knew that right? You and Tim must have talked about it. Maybe he isn’t telling you everything? As for SSDs, I think Intel is a nice match for Apple, what does Tim think though?

      Can’t wait to hear more from you and Tim! Thanks for the razor-sharp insight.

      And as to Mr. Currie, yea, he’s a real a-hole all right, but only to pinheaded jerks who come on here trolling for Apple bytes.

      Sincerely,

      dmx

    1. Your point is moot unless Apple can sell to consumers other than their regular buyers. 88% ofthe world runs on Android and Samsung is a huge benefactor. Samsung has no issues whatsoever collaborating with Apple for this very reason.

      1. Dear Brainthrust,

        Your figures are meaningless, and wrong. It’s more like 85% of smartphones running Android, not 88%. Perhaps that’s a “rounding error” on your part, so lets move on to Samsung’s share of that share – it has dropped 8 percentage points since last year from about 32% to just 24%, versus Apple who have dropped from 13% to 11%. And of course, those Samsung numbers are based on shipped units, not sold units. All figures are for worldwide sales. See here for some facts:

        http://www.idc.com/prodserv/smartphone-os-market-share.jsp

        Samsung has big issues. Some have been pointed out in places other than this little website too. Like, several federal courts in several countries. This may have even had something to do with Samsung’s little slip in the marketplace. Come back soon, I find your discourse endlessly fascinating.

        Cheers!

        dmz

  3. ???
    I thought the DRAM was built into the SOC package?
    Wouldn’t the CPU provider be providing the DRAM?
    Or is it hacked onto the CPU before it’s all put in the package?

  4. I buy Samsung memory chips for my Macs. I wish that other supplies could match their quality, but no they don’t. I just wish I didn’t have to feel dirty every time I buy products from Samsung.

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