T-Mobile US lets customers stream unlimited iTunes Radio, other streaming services without data charges

T-Mobile has unveiled a new feature that’s designed to both unleash music in America and put its LTE network’s data muscle on full display with Un-carrier 6.0.

Beginning immediately, T-Mobile’s Simple Choice customers will now be able to stream all the music they want from all the most popular streaming services, including iTunes Radio, Pandora, Rhapsody, iHeartRadio, Slacker, and Spotify – without ever hitting their high-speed 4G LTE data service. Music services from T-Mobile partners – Samsung’s Milk Music and the forthcoming Beatport music app from SFX – will also stream without data charges for T-Mobile customers. While other carriers with music offers choose a music service for you, T-Mobile is gives customers unprecedented choice with the ability to use all the top music streaming services.

“As a committed music freak, I’m personally outraged at the way the other guys are using the music you love to lure you into over-priced plans with sweet ‘promotional offers’ that quickly roll into higher prices or trigger those absurd overage charges,” said T-Mobile CEO and President John Legere in a statement. “Music should be free of all that. Music should have no limits. So, beginning right now, you can stream all you want at T-Mobile from all of the top music services – data charges do not apply.”

With streaming music seeing unprecedented growth in the U.S. and around the world, Americans are increasingly tuning in through their smartphones and tablets. Other carriers have have responded with programs designed to lock in customers and, oftentimes, hit them with overages. Because of this, 37% of people say they avoid streaming on their phones – the majority out of fear that they’ll use up their data and run into overages.

“Our competitors want you to believe that Internet radio is still free on their networks – but it’s not,” said Mike Sievert, Chief Marketing Officer for T-Mobile, in a statement. “On AT&T and Verizon, you’re paying for every note of every song you stream. You even pay for the ads. Our goal with Music Freedom is different. We want people to enjoy their music worry-free – the way it’s meant to be.”

T-Mobile is inviting customers to help decide which services to add next via a poll at www.t-mobilemusicfreedom.com or by tweeting the name of their favorite service with the hashtag #musicfreedom.

Current T-Mobile customers with Simple Choice plans don’t have to do a thing to enjoy these new benefits. Just indulge in your favorite streaming radio source, knowing it’ll never count toward your data charges.

Source: T-Mobile US, Inc.

MacDailyNews Take: Cripes, if this keeps up, we’re going to have to seriously consider switching to T-Mobile. Test Drive, here we come – we’ll even bring our own iPhone 5s units!

Everyone go to www.t-mobilemusicfreedom.com and cast your vote to turn on Apple’s Beats Music (and Sirius XM).

Related article:
T-Mobile US will give anyone a free Apple iPhone 5s with unlimited data to test for a week – June 19, 2014

19 Comments

  1. Hopefully this catches on w/ the other carriers. I would LOVE to see a carrier/provider differentiate themselves by offering unlimited TV/video streaming netflix, hulu etc. Make this happen verizon!

  2. I’m confused. Aren’t these the “unlimited data” guys? Or is the
    “simple choice” plan something else?

    Or is this for people with no data plan at all?

    1. Their ‘unlimited data’ plans typically come with a limited amount of 4G data. Once you exceed your 4G allocation, you drop down to 3G for the rest of the billing period. With this, music streaming won’t count toward your 4G allowance.

  3. I think the reality is that T-Mobile are struggling to attract or even keep customers. They have rolled out a number of promotions (pay the early contract termination fee etc) that suggest these guys are struggling. After running a campaign that went head to head with the iPhone that they lost horribly on, I really don’t know if they are going to be able to survive. They did a complete 180 but I think it is too little too late.

    1. Currently on ATT unlimited, grandfathered from the iPhone debut. Yes having iTunes Match is awesome with unlimited data. I stream my entire library from my iPhone. This is good stuff from TMobile. I hope the sprint merger doesn’t ruin this or ends these great programs from TMobile.

  4. There is a big difference between unlimited and functional in the T-Mobile world. If you are stuck with T-Mobile because you financed your phone thru them you know that yes you can use all the data you can manage to squeeze thru a needles eye. Streaming or downloads start great then slow to a crawl and then go nowhere. What good is that?

  5. My co-worker has T-Mobile and an iPhone 5c and his data speed sucks compared to mine which is AT&T. Granted, he pays less but he is also getting less. And now with TM attracting all these new customers with their deals and such I imagine the network is bogging down even more.

  6. As a customer, I appreciate this. However, as someone who’s friends with some musicians, I’m concerned that all these tactics are furthering the devaluing of music. Music labels are practically broke as it is because of streaming services and illlegal downloads. Pandora is nearly bankrupt because they can’t monetize their service. Is this sort of thing really good for music in the long run? People seem to feel this strange sense of entitlement, like music should “just be free.” I wish it could be, but we need to make sure our artists are still being paid.

  7. Wow, I’m impressed by the lack of critical thinking in the room on this. T Mobile, like Sprint, already offers unlimited data plans. This won’t effect people on those plans. This also only addresses streaming music, and not streaming movies and other video. Almost no one is going to cash in on the savings since it only for streaming music. The Sprint-T Mobile merger will create a third large phone company that can compete with ATT and Verizon, neither which offer unlimited data.

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