Norwegian Consumer Council files complaint over Apple’s ‘convoluted and unclear’ iCloud terms

“The Norwegian Consumer Council has filed a formal complaint about the terms and conditions for Apple’s iCloud, charging that they violate several articles of Norwegian law concerning product marketing,” Electronista reports.

“Earlier in 2014, the Council conducted a survey of the terms for several cloud storage services in the Norwegian market, as part of a broader effort at improving terms for all digital services available to Norwegians,” Electronista reports. “Based on data from that survey, the complaint alleges that iCloud’s terms are ‘particularly bad,’ measuring some 8,600 words and ultimately ‘convoluted and unclear.'”

Electronista reports, “Apple is the only company granting itself the right to change terms at any time without telling users. Unilateral power over changing an agreement is said to violate Section 22 of Norway’s Marketing Act.”

Read more in the full article here.

11 Comments

    1. Legal obfuscation is how the powers that be have power over everyone. Only judges and rich lawyers rule the land. It’s like in the Dark Ages when only the priests dictated laws because only they could talk to God. The USA needs to remove legalese from all laws. That way, everyone is on the same page, empowered in their understanding of their rights and responsibilities, and with less fear that comes with confusion and uncertainty. Power to the people.

  1. If you put your crap on our computers we’re not responsible for any of it, and we can do whatever we want with it.

    XOXO Apple, Inc.

    How many words was that?

  2. Electronista reports, “Apple is the only company granting itself the right to change terms at any time without telling users.

    NO IT’S NOT! Naive much?

    BUT: It is one of the sleaziest licensing tools in existence. Dump it Apple. It’s not worthy of you. Fire the dumbass lawyer who wrote too, if you please.

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