Mobile ad exchange claims Google Maps release triggers 29% surge in iOS 6 adoption

“Apple Maps was so bad that people refused to upgrade to iOS 6 until they could get Google Maps, says data from massive mobile ad exchange MoPub,” Josh Constine reports for TechCrunch. “The 12,000 apps it supports saw a 29 percent increase in unique iOS 6 users in the five days after Google Maps for iOS was released. Chitika reported just 0.2 percent growth immediately after the launch but it seems people waited for the weekend to do the long install.”

“MoPub monitors over 1 billion ad impressions a day across more than 12,000 apps and a dozen ad networks, making its data set more reliable than individual ad network Chitika,” Constine reports. “MoPub provided TechCrunch with data showing a 13 percent increase in iOS 6 users just from Monday to Wednesday, indicating many people switched to the newest Apple mobile firmware as soon as Google Maps’ standalone app arrived in the App Store.”

Constine reports, “MoPub’s CEO laid it out for me, explaining ‘we observed since the launch of Google Maps for iOS 6 a 30 percent increase in unique iOS 6 users, and we think it’s related to Google Maps. It verifies the hypothesis that people were actually holding back to upgrade until Google Maps was available.'”

Read more in the full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Bzzt! This fails our logic sensors. It’s a bit too much for us to believe that so many users would hold off on all of the iOS 6 goodies simply due to a whole bunch of Maps FUD (some issues, yes, but 95% of the debacle was concocted FUD amplified beyond recognition in the Internet echo chamber).

Logically, you’d think that if these maps addicts were savvy enough to hold off on a major iOS upgrade over some perceived issue, they’d easily have had the fortitude to simply visit Google Maps via Safari, tap “Add to Home Screen,” and then proceed to update iOS as usual. For that reason alone, we’re not buying it.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Readers “Fred Mertz” and “Dan K.” for the heads up.]

Related article:
iOS 6 adoption after Google Maps release stays flat, any negative impact of Apple Maps highly exaggerated – December 15, 2012

41 Comments

    1. It is true, but only among those who were active in Internet those days, and those who installed Google Maps obviously were.

      So while this 29% surge might be real, this does not really shows real-life statistics.

      Google maps were downloaded up to 12-15 million times, according to statistics. Such increase obviously is nowhere close to being capable to equivalent of 29% increase of iOS 6 adopters increse.

    2. 3 out of 10? I don’t think that that’s the correct application of the reported Statistic.

      What is far more likely is that the ongoing *rate of adoption* of iOS6 increased by 30%. For example, if the “before” rate was 100,000 users per week, it went to 130,000 users per week.

      Note that such a metric has **no bearing** on what percentage of iOS customers have already upgraded, because it is a measure of the “Rate of Change” to the conversion rate of the older-than-iOS6 customers.

      To use a lousy automotive analogy, it is like saying “average highway speed increases by 30% after passing a police speed trap” – – the metric has nothing to do with how many cars are on the road, nor what the posted speed limit is.

      -hh

  1. As it turned out, Apple fixed their maps about the same time that Google offered their maps app on iOS. It was a good time to upgrade for a number of reasons. I waited until they were fixed.

    1. The release of Google Maps is an impetus for those that weren’t early adopters of iOS 6 to consider it again.

      In our household NO ONE has adopted iOS 6 yet. Part of the reason why was that the original iPad was never really happy with iOS 5…

      …and part of the reason why was the Maps **apology** from Tim Cook, which indicated that it wasn’t merely FUD.

      Now that Google Maps has shipped, I expect that my iOS devices will be sacrificed …, er, “upgraded” as a test case. If all goes well, then the rest will follow…well, except for the iPad-1 (not supported).

      -hh

  2. Let’s be clear: Google Maps, before getting bounced, didn’t offer turn-by-turn voice navigation for iOS and the maps themselves were not vector based. Apple bounces them, introduces a serious alternative, albeit with less-than-optimal mass transit advice, critics go bullshit. Google is then forced to respond with a voice-by-voice navigation system and vector-based maps for free through the app store.

    Speaks volumes.

  3. Well, the availability of the Google Maps app is a big reason why I came around to updating my iPad to iOS 6 last night. I usually wait until the first maintenance update anyway before major OS upgrades, but the Apple Maps issues gave me pause.

    The first time I used Apple Maps, I called up my home address and instantly flagged two nearby businesses that were in the wrong location. This product was clearly not ready for prime time when it came out, so I figured I’d give it a little while to work more of the bugs out and let more users populate correct mistakes in the database. The flyby feature looks great and is a compelling feature in its own right, but its coverage remains very limited at best. New features don’t mean anything to me if getting them requires stepping back basic functionality.

    The Google Maps web app was simply not as good as the native Maps app that came with iOS 5.1, and while Google’s iOS Maps app also has its shortcomings (for one thing, Google still hasn’t yet issued an iPad optimized version), it’s now close enough to the functionality of old Maps app that I can dispense with that app and update the entire OS. Hello Siri …

  4. “…..“Apple Maps was so bad that people refused to upgrade to iOS 6 until they could get Google Maps…”

    How about “FUD ABOUT Apple Maps was so bad that people WERE MISLED AND THEY refused to upgrade to iOS 6 until they could get Google Maps…”

Reader Feedback

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.