TechRepublic: The premier e-reader is Apple’s iPad

Apple Online Store“According to Amazon, ebook sales have already surpassed hardback book sales and will surpass paperbacks sometime in 2011, and then both hardback and paperback combined sometime shortly thereafter,” Jason Hiner reports for TechRepublic. “That’s a much faster timeline than most of us expected and it speaks to how fast the e-reader market is accelerating.”

“With that in mind, we’d like to help TechRepublic readers in selecting an e-reader, since many of you are using them not just for reading books but business documents as well,” Hiner reports.

TechRepublic’s Top 10 e-readers:

1. Apple iPad: The premier e-reading device is the Apple iPad, for two reasons: 1.) Its high-quality full color screen, and 2.) It’s ability to handle everything from ebooks (from multiple ebook stores and in multiple formats), magazines, PDFs, newspapers, web pages, emails, and many other electronic files. It’s the information omnivore’s device. If you just want to read books, there are better options.
2. Amazon Kindle
3. Barnes & Noble Nook
4. Apple iPhone: Not to be overlooked as an e-reader is the iPhone. You can read Kindle and Barnes & Noble ebooks on it as well as lots of news sources via apps and web pages. You may not want to sit down and read on it for hours, it’s great for reading when standing in lines, waiting at the doctor’s office, and traveling, for example. You’d be surprised at how much reading you can get done just by using these short snatches of time.
5. Borders Kobo
6. Sony Reader, Touch Edition (PRS-650)
7. Amazon Kindle DX
8. HTC EVO 4G
9. Spring Design Alex
10. Pandigital Novel
Honorable mentions: Copia Ocean and Bookeen Cybook

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: Only iPad has access to Apple’s iBooks, Amazon’s Kindle, Barnes & Noble’s NOOK, eBooks by Kobo, and literally (get it?) millions of other books from other iPad apps. iPad is for bibliophiles. All other e-readers are limited. Only iPad does it all!

68 Comments

  1. More emphasis needs to be made on how the iPad can read ALL book formats. If you go with a Kindle or Nook or anything else, you are severely restricting yourself and in the long run, you’ll regret it.

  2. More emphasis needs to be made on how the iPad can read ALL book formats. If you go with a Kindle or Nook or anything else, you are severely restricting yourself and in the long run, you’ll regret it.

  3. Probably the one thing that I haven’t done with the iPad is read a book. Magazine, yes; comic book, yes; books, no. There are so many cool things to do with the iPad that my ADD will not allow books.

  4. Probably the one thing that I haven’t done with the iPad is read a book. Magazine, yes; comic book, yes; books, no. There are so many cool things to do with the iPad that my ADD will not allow books.

  5. The sad thing for Amazon is that they could have controlled (or at least dominated) the transition from paper books to ebooks by releasing the original Kindle at a break-even price, something like $99 (or as low as possible). Amazon has the opposite business compared to Apple… Apple sells various media content at a break-even price to make money selling the “players.” Amazon wants to profit from selling the content, not the hardware. The Kindle device should be like HP selling a printer; Amazon should have “given it away” for a low price in order to encourage sales of the “refills.”

    Instead, Amazon kept the Kindle’s price high initially (and until quite recently). I don’t think the goal was to make a large profit on the hardware. I think they were trying to minimize disruption to their existing business of selling paper books, and slowly transition to ebooks, even delay it.

    Now, Apple controls the most popular device for ebook consumption. Amazon is still an important player, because they will probably sell the majority of ebooks, but they are just going along for the ride on iPad. I read ebooks on my iPhone, and I mostly use the Kindle app. But I would never buy a Kindle device.

  6. The sad thing for Amazon is that they could have controlled (or at least dominated) the transition from paper books to ebooks by releasing the original Kindle at a break-even price, something like $99 (or as low as possible). Amazon has the opposite business compared to Apple… Apple sells various media content at a break-even price to make money selling the “players.” Amazon wants to profit from selling the content, not the hardware. The Kindle device should be like HP selling a printer; Amazon should have “given it away” for a low price in order to encourage sales of the “refills.”

    Instead, Amazon kept the Kindle’s price high initially (and until quite recently). I don’t think the goal was to make a large profit on the hardware. I think they were trying to minimize disruption to their existing business of selling paper books, and slowly transition to ebooks, even delay it.

    Now, Apple controls the most popular device for ebook consumption. Amazon is still an important player, because they will probably sell the majority of ebooks, but they are just going along for the ride on iPad. I read ebooks on my iPhone, and I mostly use the Kindle app. But I would never buy a Kindle device.

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