U.S. FTC expected to block Google’s AdMob buy

invisibleSHIELD case for iPad“Reports are growing that the Federal Trade Commission will move to block Google Inc.’s $750 million acquisition of Admob Inc.,” The Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal reports.

“The Wall Street Journal’s All Things Digital blog on Monday cited multiple unnamed sources who said executives at both the San Mateo mobile advertsing startup and the Mountain View search giant expect the FTC to try to block the deal,” The Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal reports.” The FTC last month said it was seeking sworn declarations from Google’s competitors and advertisers, a sign taken to mean that it was lining up opposition to the sale.

The Silicon Valley / San Jose Business Journal reports, “The agency is reportedly concerned that such a sale would reduce competition in the market for advertising on mobile phones.”

Full article here.

[Thanks to MacDailyNews Reader “iWill” for the heads up.]

13 Comments

  1. Hey, remember . . . Google’s official company motto is “Do No Evil.”

    Just as any alcoholic’s official motto is “Drink No Booze.”

    [Choose your enemies carefully. You become them.]

  2. As much as I think Google is evil and want them to fail, I say let them have AdMob. Apple’s iAd platform is going to gain significant market share very soon, so a lot of AdMob’s value to Google will be lost anyway.

  3. Oh, don’t forget, the clever deal the Admob guys did with Google — if the FTC blocks the sale, Google still has to pay Admob $700 million! Hilarious!

  4. Since Google pretty much has search dominance over the web this makes alot of sense. Not only will they own the results, sell & direct the ads, but they could potentially be able to then manipulate whole markets.

    You can’t really compare this to the AAPL/iAd relationship because it’s on a mobile platform that is contained within Apple products ONLY–and where there is plenty of competition in the space outside that ecosystem.

  5. Google’s purchase of AdMob isn’t going to be a fraction as devastating to competition in the mobile advertising market as Apple’s refusal to allow third party advertisers to track user metrics.

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