Adobe to sue Apple, say ‘sources close to Adobe’

invisibleSHIELD case for iPad“Usually I write about security here, but Apple’s iron-bound determination to keep Adobe Flash out of any iWhatever device is about to blow up in Apple’s face,” Jim Lynch reports for ITworld. “Sources close to Adobe tell me that Adobe will be suing Apple within a few weeks.”

MacDailyNews Take: Why is that considered something that’s blowing up in Apple’s face? Why not Adobe’s face? Lynch seems more than a bit biased to us (read his full screed, link below).

The fact is that iPhone OS is Apple’s platform, Adobe. You know, like the Mac that you wrote off for dead? Whoops!

You chose your platform, Adobe. Now go decline into irrelevance along with it.

Lynch continues, “Officially, Adobe’s not talking about such actions, but there’s no question that Adobe is ticked off big time at Apple.”

MacDailyNews Take: Tough shit.

Lynch continues, “Unless things change drastically between Apple and Adobe in the next few weeks, from what I’m hearing you can expect to see Adobe taking Apple to court over the issue.”

MacDailyNews Take: Why do we get the feeling that Lynch’s big source is Lee Brimelow? If Adobe’s higher ups are really thinking about this, they’re not thinking clearly.

Full article here.

MacDailyNews Take: We can’t wait to hear Adobe’s legal argument, right after we hear Burger King’s lawyers argue in court that McDonald’s must be forced to offer Whoppers.

As we wrote last Friday, “[Adobe] should have focused more on Apple’s Mac instead of foolishly waiting for the platform to die and then, when it didn’t drop dead as you hoped, treating Mac users as second-class citizens while pimping inferior Windows PCs. Flash is a proprietary, resource-hogging, browser-crashing abomination and we don’t want ported software on our iPhones, iPads, or Macs; software designed for the lowest common denominator is inferior to software designed to take advantage of individual platforms’ strengths.”

Note to advertisers: (including those who advertise via third-party ad networks and become, in effect, our advertisers): Your Flash-based ads are no longer reaching the most well-heeled customers online: 50+ million iPhone owners. They’re also not hitting brand new iPad users or 35+ million iPod touch users. If you care about reaching people with discretionary income, you might want to consider dumping your flash-based ads and moving to a more open format that people with money and the will to spend it can actually see.

Help kill Adobe’s Flash:
• Ask CNBC to offer HTML5 video via the customer support web form here.
• Contact Hulu and ask them to offer HTML5 video via email:
• Ask ESPN360 to offer HTML5 video instead Flash via their feedback page here.
• Join YouTube’s HTML5 beta here.
• On Vimeo, click the “Switch to HTML5 player” link below any video.

97 Comments

  1. On what ground?!!! If Adobe sues, they will become the laughing stock of tech companies that can’t compete. I’ll consider company as a close relative to Palm.

  2. This is going to make things awkward the next time Steve has Adobe’s CEO on stage for an Apple Keynote Event. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />

  3. Apple can counter sue that Adobe is trying to force Apple to use a program (Flash) that seriously impairs computer performance. If Apple were an automobile it would be like Adobe demanding that Apple cars use Adobe’s wooden wheels.

  4. Lazy ass Adobe not only are OSX laggards, not only iPhone OS wannabes, and not only Apple blackmailers, but also think they can win a bitching match against Apple in court.

    Piss on em.

  5. Don’t worry Adobe,

    There’s always the Joojoo. Apple doesn’t have a monopoly. ” width=”19″ height=”19″ alt=”wink” style=”border:0;” />
    I’m sure the Courier will materialize one of these years.

  6. I enjoy MDN to show me what’s going on in Apple land. However, your comments in regard to this article show just how little you understand the law. It is one thing to not allow Flash to run on the iPhone for what was initialy a valid concern. (and continues to be) It is quite another to take advantage of a huge market leadership, also known as a monopoly, in the mobile device space and use it to drive a competitor out of a different space that you want to enter or that you already compete in. Apple went to far with their iPhone OS 4 agreement when they banned the use of tools like Flash CS5’s cross platform compilation features.

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